T.I.G.E.R.S. - Who says you need to go to Africa for a Safari?

Friday, July 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!

Who says you need to go to Africa for a Safari?

T.I.G.E.R.S. is home to some of the world's most famous animal actors, stars of stage and screen. Dr. Bhagavan "Doc" Antle is the founder and director of T.I.G.E.R.S. and The Rare Species Fund. While growing up on a vast cattle ranch in Arizona, Doc raised and cared for every amazing wild and exotic animal he could get his hands on. His passion took him to mainland China and other parts of Asia where he studied for and received his doctoral degree in medicine.

He returned to the United States in the early 80's and created an alternative drugless therapy clinic utilizing meditation, diet and exercise programs. In 1982, Doc was introduced to a Siberian tiger cub by a zoo director. Doc was so amazed by the presence of the tiger that he asked if he might use the tiger at the end of one of his lectures to demonstrate how even the most powerful animals were greatly affected by their environment. One of the impressed audience members was the local head of Exxon Oil who invited Doc to present the tiger and his message outlining the dangers of environmental damage at an upcoming Exxon Convention. Needless to say they were blown away and an amazing partnership was born between Doc Antle and the big cats of the world.

Today, Doc is widely recognized as one of the foremost animal trainers in the world, having worked with thousands of animals, and traveled the globe promoting the education and conservation of some of our planet's most rare and endangered species.

Learn more about conservation efforts for tigers, ligers, elephants, orangutans, gibbons, apes and more. Visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com/signup to get started on your own interactive tour while helping this amazing foundation!

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The world's first ever white lion-tiger hybrids

Friday, June 27, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Welcome again and good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  The tour and Preservation Station are in full swing!  If you're a regular reader here, you know we often talk about our amazing LIGER, a cross between a Lion and a White Tiger.  

These five-month-old liger cubs are the nephews of Hercules, pictured below, the official Guinness Book of World Records largest cat on the planet! The four male liger cubs are the first ever to be born from a white male lion and a white female tiger, making them the world's most unique big cats. 

The four brothers named Yeti, Odlin, Sampson, and Apollo are the world's first ever white lion-tiger hybrids. Their parents are the famous wildlife ambassadors, Ivory and Saraswati, at Jungle Island in Miami, FL. Ivory and Saraswati met each other at the Myrtle Beach Safari in Myrtle Beach, SC. There are only around 300 white lions and 1,200 white tigers left in the world, so the cubs' father and mother are extremely rare in their own right. Ivory is a white African lion and Saraswati is a snow white Bengal tiger.

These adorable cubs may look unassuming but they could grow to be the biggest cats in the world averaging a weight gain of one pound per day! A liger is just what it sounds like, a cross between a male lion and tigress. There are around 1,000 ligers in the world but none of them are white.

According to Dr. Antle, Yeti (pictured on far left) is the biggest and most boisterous, pushing past his smaller brothers and wanting to be the center of attention. Doc says he is sure Yeti will reach the size of his Uncle Hercules, if not larger. "I am convinced Yeti will make the Guinness Book of Records. He's so big already - has such a big, fat head and paws. All the cubs grow so quickly but Yeti is already so much bigger". Apollo is the smallest and behaves more like a house kitten, purring all the time and demanding to be stroked. Ligers tend to enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers and are sociable like lions.  

"We've had everyone from Congressman to people from all walks of life get on planes to fly in to see such an incredibly unique sight", says Doc Antle, "they have such a beautiful creamy color that I have never seen on a cat before".

*Thank you to Lucy Osborne and the UK Daily Mail Online for their help in this publication.*

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve and T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation  Station were created as a wildlife education organization dedicated to promoting global conservation. With informative, educational and entertaining interactive programs, Dr. Bhagavan Antle has created a once-in-a-lifetime experience! Dr. Antle, Director of T.I.G.E.R.S., works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in North America, South America, Africa and Southeast Asia.   To make reservations over the phone, please call 843.855.2699 or click here.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - "We can bring endangered species back"

Friday, May 16, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Hello and good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  The Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve  just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.  

Enjoy this recent article:  

MEDFORD, Ore. — Oregon's famous wandering gray wolf, dubbed OR-7, may have found the mate he has trekked thousands of miles looking for, wildlife authorities said Monday. It's likely the pair spawned pups, and if confirmed, the rare predators would be the first breeding pair of wolves in the Oregon's Cascade Range since the early 1900s.

Officials said cameras in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in the southern Cascades captured several images of what appears to be a female wolf in the same area where OR-7's GPS collar shows he has been living.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said it is not proof, but it is likely the two wolves mated over the winter and are rearing pups that would have been born in April. Biologists won't start looking for a den until June, to avoid endangering the pups.

"It's amazing that he appears to have found a mate," Stephenson said. "I didn't think it would happen. It makes me more impressed with the ability of wolves to survive and find one another."

Young wolves typically leave their pack and strike out for a new territory, hoping to find a mate and start a new pack.

OR-7 has been looking for a mate since leaving the Imnaha pack in northeastern Oregon in September 2011. His travels have taken him thousands of miles as he crossed highways, deserts and ranches in Oregon, moved down the spine of the Cascade Range deep into Northern California and then back to Oregon, all without getting shot, having an accident or starving.

Federal Endangered Species Act protections for wolves have been lifted in eastern Oregon, where the bulk of them reside, but they remain in force in the Cascades. Protections for the animals have also ended in the last several years in the Northern Rockies and western Great Lakes.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed ending the listing across most of the rest of the country as populations have rebounded. A final decision is expected later this year.

If a wolf was going to start a pack in a new part of Oregon, ranchers should be glad it is OR-7, who has no history of preying on livestock, said Bill Hoyt, past president of the Oregon Cattlemen's Association. The group supports Oregon's wolf recovery plan and is looking forward to the day the predator's numbers and range expand enough for their protections to be removed.

Steve Pedery, conservation director of Oregon Wild, said the news was "spectacular." The conservation group won a court ruling barring the state from killing two members of OR-7's home pack for preying on livestock and later won a settlement strictly limiting when wolves can be killed.

"It goes to show that when we act on America's best impulses for the environment, amazing things can happen. We can bring endangered species back," he said.

Stephenson expected the battery on OR-7's GPS collar to die soon, so the biologist set up trail cameras based on the wolf's most recent whereabouts. The GPS locations also showed OR-7 was staying within a smaller area, common behavior when wolves have pups to feed.

When he checked the cameras last week, Stephenson said one had recorded a black wolf he had not seen before. An hour later, OR-7 was photographed on the same camera. The black wolf was confirmed to be female because she squatted to urinate.

Officials had planned to let OR-7's collar die, but now that he appears to have found a mate, he will be fitted with a new one this summer to monitor the pack.

Stephenson said officials had no idea where the female came from.
By JEFF BARNARD  The Associated PressMay 12, 2014

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Animals you see on TV and movies

Friday, May 9, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  The staff and animals, dedicated to ongoing breeding and international conservation projects are currently in full swing at the 50 acre Preserve and Preservation Station.

T.I.G.E.R.S. was founded by Dr. Bhagavan Antle. He is one of the World’s foremost trainers of big cats and other exotic animals. Doc Antle’s animal actors have appeared in over 500 films, television shows, commercials and advertisements worldwide.

Mary Quinn O'Connor, Reporter program at Fox News describes these animal actors:

If you’ve ever wondered where the animals you see on TV and movies live when they're not on set, or even how they learn to “act”, look no further than Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. This tourist destination, known mainly for its sunny weather and crowded beaches, is also home to Tigers Preservation Station and Safari (T.I.G.E.R.S) a safari for celebrity animals.
 
“Watching the film and television process happen gave me an idea that recreating that for our guests gave them the chance to see animals up close and in action doing things like their favorite television moments,” said T.I.G.E.R.S. Founder and safari director Dr. Bhagavan Antle.
 
“Doc” created a safari for visitors from around the world to come and see these highly trained animals in their natural habitat. You may recognize these animals from films such as "Ace Ventura", "Doctor Doolittle", "Jungle Book", and "Mighty Joe Young".


 
“We act as agents for the animals,” said Antle. “Producers from movie and television call us up and say ‘We need a tiger who will just go up and lay down with an actress,’" said Antle.
 
The trainers at T.I.G.E.R.S make that request a reality. Through hundreds of hours of training a week, these animals become accustomed to working with humans.
 
“That gives the animals an edge in working the movie and television business because they are already so acclimated to the human lifestyle,” said Antle.
 
Thirty years ago, Antle created this unique safari experience where guests could come and interact (sit with them, play with them, and feed them) with these wild, endangered, and even famous animals like nowhere else in the world.


 
“It’s not going to the zoo, it something all together different,” said one safari guest.

The animals at this safari have already starred in over 500 movie and television shows over the past 30 years, and some of these animals still have a long career ahead of them-- like Bubbles the Elephant. Bubbles has starred in many movies, but is most famous for her role in Ace Ventura.
 
“She’s what I call the world’s biggest movie star,” said Antle. “There has been another elephant in a movie but its not as tall or heavy as Bubbles.”
 
By visiting Bubbles or some of your other favorite animal-stars, you are contributing to the Rare Species Fund which was established to provide funding to critical international wildlife conservation programs.
 
“The animal actors and the animals that are here meeting the guests will raise money for grassroots conservation programs that give people the chance to save wildlife throughout the world,” said Antle.

Ian Guerin gave a plug this week in the article called, "Ten reasons to stay at Barefoot Resort in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina":

The T.I.G.E.R.S. (short for The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) Preservation Station gets visitors up close and personal with the world's rarest tiger breeds, apes and chimpanzees. For the more daring, tickets are also available for T.I.G.E.R.S. outdoor preserve, located 17 miles south of Barefoot.

That is the home to Hercules, a 900-pound Liger (lion-tiger hybrid) recognized in the 2014 Guinness Book of World Records as the world's largest cat.

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Yeti, Odlin, Sampson and Apolo

Thursday, April 24, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from  T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Get up close and personal and see rare tigers and apes at this exhibit, with photo sessions available that help support the conservation and breeding efforts of these animals. Tiger trainers are also on hand to answer any questions.

Enjoy this recent article about T.I.G.E.R.S.:

These adorable cubs may look cute and unassuming but they are in fact the rarest of their species – and could grow to be the biggest cats in the world.

The four handsome male ‘liger’ cubs are the first ever to be born from a white male lion and white female tiger, making them the world’s most unique big cats.

There are only around 300 white lions and 1,200 white tigers left in the world, so the cubs’ father, Ivory and mother, Saraswati, are extremely rare in their own right.

  • Yeti, Odlin, Sampson and Apolo are the world's most unique big cats
  • First 'liger' cubs to be born from white male lion and white female tiger
  • At six weeks old, they already weigh 15lbs and gain a pound a day

According to Director Dr. Bahglavan Antle, Yeti is the biggest and most boisterous, pushing past his smaller brothers and wanting to be the center of attention. Doc says he is sure Yeti will reach the size of his Uncle Hercules, if not larger. "I am convinced Yeti will make the Guinness Book of Records. He's so big already - has such a big, fat head and paws. All the cubs grow so quickly but Yeti is already so much bigger". Apollo is the smallest and behaves more like a house kitten, purring all the time and demanding to be stroked. Ligers tend to enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers and are sociable like lions.  

"We've had everyone from Congressman to people from all walks of life get on planes to fly in to see such an incredibly unique sight", says Doc Antle, "they have such a beautiful creamy color that I have never seen on a cat before". By Lucy Osborne dailymail.uk.co

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com .

T.I.G.E.R.S. - 2014 season opens tomorrow!

Friday, March 14, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  Got plans for the weekend?  The weather will be spectacular and tomorrow is THE BIG DAY.  The greatest Myrtle Beach attraction opens for the 2014 season!
 
There are two ways to experience the greatest hands-on, interactive wildlife encounter in the world. You can visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station, located at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach for free! Or you can take the T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounter Tour in Myrtle Beach.


 
Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.
 
This is the best way for you to support our ongoing breeding and international conservation projects and get hands on with what we do.
 
By attending the tour you get one comlimentary 8X10 photo per group of your choice from your tour. However we highly recommend our Photo CD.  Our Photo CD is a professional CD portfolio of you and the animals on the tour. It has each person in your group individually with the animals, your group together with the animals, candid shots of your day and photos of the animals themselves. You end up with several hundred photos that you have the right to reproduce as long as it is not for commerial puposes like ads, billboards, movie and television.
 
Wild Encounter Tours
5 days a week from
March 15, 2014 through October 11, 2014
Tours are on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
Beginning at 10:00am and lasting approx. 3 hours.

Click here to request a Wild Encounters Tour online
OR
Call 843-361-4552
 
Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The 2014 tour begins in 8 days!

Friday, March 7, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach.   The 2014 Season is just 8 days away! 

Some think it's too risky to get close to wild animals, but the handlers at  T.I.G.E.R.S. have been with these animals since they were cubs and have developed a special friendship based on love and respect.  Dr. Antle and his staff have actually helped the mothers deliver many of the cubs at the Preserve.  T.I.G.E.R.S. has a proven method of training these animals: Never treat them as pets, lots of tender loving care, and thousands of hours of one-on-one handling; we even live with the animals 24 hours a day.  

So have you ever wondered, What's the largest cat on earth?  

HIs name is Hercules, so you know he's got to be big.

At 922 pounds, big is an understatement for the world's largest living cat, according to the 2014 Guinness Book of World Records.

Hercules is a liger -- the hybrid offspring of a male lion and a tigress -- who lives at T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. He is 131 inches long, and measures 49 inches tall at the shoulder.

Born from a lion father and tiger mother, Hercules grew into an impressive creature, able to run at speeds of up to 50 mph and eat 100 pounds of food in one sitting.  Ligers have been known to be fat and unhealthy cats, but Hercules is an exceptional specimen that got the best from both feline races.

Despite his gigantic size, Hercules is very tame and Dr. Bhagavan, one of the liger’s caretakers, says looking into his eyes is “like looking into God’s own eyes”.

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, T.I.G.E.R.S. & Preservation Station. All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Catasaurus Rex is One Big CAT!

Friday, February 21, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach.  The temps are much higher now and so is our excitement!  The 2014 season begin in just 22 days!  Make plans now to interact with big cats and other wild animals without a barrier.

Speaking of big cats, enjoy this story:

A 3-foot, 21-pound rescue cat nicknamed "Catasaurus Rex" now has a forever home after being found on the side of the road and rehomed twice.
 
When the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals advertised the massive feline last month, more than 50 people submitted adoption applications.
 
Pickles the catThe rescue decided that Andrew Milicia and his girlfriend, Emily Zarvos, would be a good fit for the feline, whose real name is Pickles.



Photo Credit: Barcroft USA
 
"When we first saw Pickles, he looked like such a beast, but he looked really cool. He's actually bigger than some dogs," Milicia told the Daily Mail. "It didn’t take him long to make himself at home and now he takes up most of the couch when he's laid out."
 
Pickles is thought to be part Maine coon, the largest breed of domestic cat. A Maine coon named Stewie currently holds the world record for longest cat.
 
"He doesn’t realize his size, so he'll knock things over all the time. He's so clumsy," Milicia said. "But it's like so hard to be mad at him. He thinks he's just like a little kitten still."
 
But at more than 20 pounds, Pickles isn’t always easy to handle.
 
"I struggle to pick him up sometimes because he weighs so much," Zarvos said.
 
Despite the difficulties in having such a large cat, Milicia and Zarvos say they can't imagine life without Pickles.
 
The large gray tabby loves to cuddle on the couch, get his nails trimmed and sleep with his new owners in their bed.
 
Although he has feline immunodeficiency virus, the shelter says as long as he stays indoors, he should stay healthy and live a long life.
 
"I'm so happy we have him,” Zarvos said. "He's the best pet you could hope for."
- By Laura Moss Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 2:47 PM

The Wild Encounter Tour is a guided walk through a beautiful 50 acre preserve, which is taken in the company of professional photographers taking photos and video footage to capture the experience for the guests. Visitors can interact with apes, orangutans, and chimpanzees, watch tigers swim, observe gray wolves, fly trained falcons and again have the chance to sit small cubs on their laps. In addition to this the tour comes across Bubbles the four ton African elephant and the Liger, which is a cross between a lion and a tiger and is the largest cat in the world.

Big Cat T.I.G.E.R.S. - Big Cat Safety, Handling and Training

Friday, December 6, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

It's a beautiful day at T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  I hope you all caught the episode on Nat Geo last Friday Night.  T.I.G.E.R.S. was featured on an episode of Big Cat Week.

And now, an interesting article I found:

Big Cat Safety, Handling and Training

By Dr. Bhagavan Antle, Director at T.I.G.E.R.S.

These are just some of my observations over the last 24 years as I have trained some 400 big cats and met hundreds more. By big cats, I only mean the Panthera family (lions, tigers, leopard, jaguars and hybrids) all the rest are in a different category and the small cats (including cheetah and pumas) are in a different class. They will kill you, but it is not with the same intent and aggressive behavior. Male lions are 100 times harder to train than tigers.

What is training?

Training is bridging the gap between what you want the animal to do and getting him to do it. It is the language that you use to talk to animals if you want them to do something. A animal is not trained unless it will do basic behaviors regularly and repeatedly without trouble.

Behavior in response to command is a language you create. This language allows you to communicate with big cats. Without this language put in place, you have random communication with the cat and safety is precarious.

Many people try to "train" cats with food. This type of reward system creates a food drive that if used improperly can lead to and create a dangerous response. If you are working a cat outside of a cage like this, when no food is available, you are no longer in control. You can bridge certain behaviors with food, but you must then do them without, to assure the behavior is solid. A trained cat will walk into a strange place and do what you want when you want because you ask it, not because you feed it.

 

What constitutes a trained big cat?

Being able to have a cat walk over to you after you open the door and lay down at your feet and then allow you to make contact is the beginning of a safe relationship. Having the cat stay in the cage with the door open until you request it to exit is essential to safety.

Trained cats will sit, come, stay, steady, back up, lay down, go to, get on etc... just like a trained obedience dog will. Trained cats will do this regularly and repeatedly, inside or outside of the cage without food rewards. A trained cat will climb onto a seat or table 5 to 10 times in a row without breaking down.

One of the first things our more than 50 lions, tigers, leopards, liger's and jaguars are trained to do, is come out of a door or gate, in response to us calling their name. These animals are in groups of up to 10 or more, they have to wait their turn, and not push past any opening. Most of them have to do this 2 x a day as they are taken in from multi acre habitats, and brought into the main house for care, observation and feeding with full contact with the trainers the whole time.

A cat that you fool around with in a cage or through a cage is not trained. Without solid behaviors that are regular and repeatable you are at risk. The only sure way you know what the animal will do is when it does what you ask repeatedly.

There will be more of this article in future posts.



Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Home to over 60 big cats

Friday, November 15, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good chilly afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  

Come visit the 50-acre preserve, home to over 60 big cats.  The 2014 season opens March 16th!  I just found out this week that T.I.G.E.R.S. will be featured on Big The National Geographic Channel November 29.  The episode, called Super Cat will be aired during Big Cat Week on the network.  More on this later.

Some of the big cats you will see on the Nat Geo episode and at T.I.G.E.R.S. are:
 

Bengal Tiger - This cat is the most numerous tiger subspecies  The total population is estimated at fewer than 2,500 individuals with a decreasing trend.  Over the past century tiger numbers have fallen dramatically.  None of the Tiger Conservation Landscapes within the Bengal tiger range is large enough to support an effective population size of 250 individuals. Habitat losses and the extremely large-scale incidences of poaching are serious threats to the species' survival.

 

 



Liger - The liger is a hybrid cross between a male lion and a tigress. Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species.  Hercules, who resides at the preserve (pictured above) is The World's Largest Living Cat according to the 2014 Guinness Book of World Records    Ligers are extremely social animals. They are happy and content living with both lions and tigers.

 

 



Leopards - Leopards are graceful and powerful big cats closely related to lions, tigers, and jaguars. They live in sub-Saharan Africa, northeast Africa, Central Asia, India, and China. However, many of their populations are endangered, especially outside of Africa.  Adept climbers, leopards will often drag their food into trees to protect it from scavengers.

Learn more about the animals and the preserve at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.
 

T.I.G.E.R.S - Hercules makes the Guinness Book of World Records!

Friday, September 20, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good sunny afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  If you've kept up with the local news this past week, you know that Hercules, who lives at the Myrtle Beach wildlife preserve has made the Guinness World Records book!  Read this article from last week:

By Steve Palisin — spalisin@thesunnews.com

Morris the Cat wouldn’t have one paw, let alone one claw, up on Hercules, the world’s largest living feline.

This liger – a hybrid of a lion and tiger – tips the scales at 922 pounds, and is now entered into the 2014 edition of the “Guinness World Records” book, published Thursday (www.guinnessworldrecords.com).

Sara Wilcox, public relations and marketing executive for New York-based Guinness World Records North America, said Hercules lives at Myrtle Beach Safari, an area wildlife preserve. She cited two other vitals of the big cat: a total length of 131 inches and height of 49 inches at the shoulder.

The safari, also known as TIGERS – The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species – where tours are given by reservation, is owned by Bhagavan “Doc” Antle, who also founded the Rare Species Fund ( www.rarespeciesfund.org) in 1982, to help endangered wildlife around the world such as elephants, rhinos, orangutans and other big cats.

Antle was not available for comment for this article, but Wilcox said he furnished Guinness, a company headquartered in London, a summary of various traits about Hercules.

He was born among a litter of four in November 2001 at the preserve and named after the mythological character. The cat, who consumes 20 to 25 pounds of meat daily and has favorite logs he uses to sharpen his claws, also has traveled coast to coast with Antle to promote wildlife conservation.

Guinness officials were told by Antle that Hercules melds two worlds by being brave like a tiger and social like a lion, hence the big cat’s affinity for interaction.

Antle also told Guinness that as a cub, Hercules had a big head into which he grew with age and that if the cat’s averse to doing something, he simply sits down.

 


Recounting how Hercules has reacted to the rarity of snowfall on the Grand Strand, Antle told Guinness that the cat rolled around in the accumulation, enough to make a giant liger snow angel.

Wilcox said Guinness happened upon Hercules through a consultant, and that the cat sets a precedent in the book’s records.

Guinness officials had known of “generic liger cat breeds” but that “not a specific cat” occupied a record as the largest living cat, until Hercules.

“We just knew that the largest living cat probably was the liger,” Wilcox said. “We have not measured a liger before. ... We are aware of other ligers.”

Wilcox said each edition of Guinness World Records contains as many as 4,000 records and that about 3,000 are set or broken, then updated for publishing, every year. Some records, such as the world’s largest man, keep their placeholder among the pages for a long time.

The 2014 edition of the book will include some technological bonus material over which readers can marvel at one-of-a-kind people, feats and elements, all compiled from a database of about 50,000 records tallied with time.

Certain pages in the new book will come with spots that people can scan with a portable communications device, so that anyone who checks out the world’s shortest woman, for instance, will have an enhanced experience to learn about her life through special effects.

“She will come to actual life size in front of you,” Wilcox said.


 Learn more about Doc, the animals and the tour at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - A wonderful interactive experience

Thursday, September 12, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Where can you go to have a wonderful interactive experience with wild animals?  TIGERS Preserve of course.  The season ends next month so book your tour as soon as possible.  



T.I.G.E.R.S. was created as a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational, and entertaining interactive programs. Director Dr. Bhagavan Antle works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in South America, Africa and Thailand. In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, The personnel have been involved in field research as well.

Doc and his crew are wonderful and truly care about saving endangered species.  



Take the tour of T.I.G.E.R.S. preserve where you will connect with wildlife in a very intimate way and involve yourself personally in the lives of these amazing animals. Then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach - Read what others said recently!

Friday, August 23, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!   I hope you enjoy the posts and comments you read here.  I have written about the animals; tigers, ligers, panthers, orangutans, and other exotic animals.  I've also kept you up to date on the Director, Dr. Bhagavan Antle and the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff and their efforts and dedication to  global conservation.

Now read what others said recently:

“TAKE THE VIP TOUR - IT IS A LIFETIME OF MEMORIES”
- KY Traveler2010 Reviewed August 10, 2013

The tour lasted five hours or so. This was the only place with no cell phones on our vacations! :) We got to kiss tiger cubs. Pet a lion cub. Feed carrots to an elephant named Bubbles. Interact with wolf pups and a lynx. My daughter absolutely loved rubbing the belly of a white tiger cub. My wife fell in love with the Organtun, We loved holding the chimp. Watching the tiger and cheetah demonstrations were awesome!!! The tour is very educational and fun at the same time. The admission price for the tour supports the Myrtle Beach facility and projects to save endangered animals all over the world. Snacks and drinks are provided. Rob was a great guide and very friendly. Would definitely do it all over again.


“"The Wildlife Encounters Tour was Awesome!!"”
- beachlover44 Reviewed August 2, 2013

My son and I went on the tour of the preserve last month and it was an experience we both will never forget. The staff are wonderful and I felt it was definitey worth the price. The pictures they took are very professional and we got the Photo CD/DVD combo so we will always have those pictures to look and and get developed. I can't wait to go back again when we go with my parents in a couple of years.


“Loved our time here”
- bp2011  Reviewed July 29, 2013 via mobile

We really enjoyed coming to the TIGERS wildlife tour. We got to pet and play with baby tiger cubs, lion cubs, lynx, orangutans, a gibbon, an elephant and more. You can really tell that all of the staff members absolutely love what they do and love and take care of these animals as their own children. The photo and DVD package that they offer it is so handy and we didn't have to think about taking photos because there were photographers taking pictures! It was a very memorable time and we will definitely return in the future. It would be really awesome if they offered even more VIP packages where you could spend a little extra time with the animal of your choice or something. For small groups or couples! We would have liked a little more time with some of them but overall the tour was full of surprises and wonderful memories you can't see anywhere else!
Visited July 2013

 

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org.
 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - New carnivore species discovered this week.

Friday, August 16, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good rainy Friday to all from T.I.G.E.R.S. VIP Tour in Myrtle Beach!!   Dr. Bhagavan Antle has an animal preserve in Myrtle Beach for you to visit.  You can get up close and personal a variety of rare and endangered Species.  It is a one of a kind Myrtle Beach Attraction.

Speaking of rare species, in the news this week:



First new carnivore species in 35 years discovered

After years of sleuthing, the Smithsonian has identified a new species of carnivore. The olinguito is a rust-colored, furry mammal that lives in the treetops of the Andes Mountains and weighs two pounds, making it the most petite member of the raccoon family.

A team led by Smithsonian zoologist Kristofer M. Helgen spent years examining hundreds of museum specimens and tracking animals in the wild in the cloud forests of Ecuador. The result? It identified a new species of mammal, the olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina). The discovery corrects a case of mistaken identity. For decades, scientists thought the olinguito was an olingo, a larger member of the raccoon family, or another mammal. -Mark Gurney, washingtonpost.com


Another source described the new finding:

Native to the high, misty cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, the olinguito is the smallest member of the raccoon family, according to Kristofer Helgen, a Smithsonian scientist who recognized it as a distinct species 10 years ago.

They have thick, woolly fur that is brighter than that of the more drab-colored Olingos. Olinguitos are about 2.5 feet (.76 meter) long and weigh about 2 pounds (900 grams). Males and females are about the same size, and females raise a single baby at a time, the scientists said.

Olinguitos are hard to spot in the cloud forests of the northern Andes, which are thickly wooded and often shrouded in fog or mist with elevations of 5,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level. Largely nocturnal, they spend most of their time in the forest canopy and are adept at jumping from tree to tree. -
chicagotribune.com

Visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the ligers and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - For an unforgettable experience

Friday, August 2, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach!  If you have never experienced a hands-on, up close and personal animal exhibit, now is the time to visit!  The season is in full swing!

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. is home to an extensive collection of rare and endangered animals like tigers, lions, elephants, bears, wolves, and orangutans and is a leading advocacy group in protecting animals and encouraging conservation and sustainability.  Over the last decade T.I.G.E.R.S. has donated over 200 thousand dollars, as well as time, effort and expertise, to grassroots conservation programs in Asia and Africa.

Last February, the subject of one of my posts was The Myrtle Beach Marathon and the appearance of a number of these animals in race activities.  

Just recently announced, The 17th Annual Myrtle Beach Marathon next February will again be transformed into a jungle scene.  Race organizers have partnered with the Rare Species Fund for International Wildlife Conservation to create a weekend filled with wild animal encounters and opportunities to connect with rare species that you’ve only seen on television.  



For an unforgettable experience, make plans to be in Myrtle Beach in February!



Learn more about conservation efforts for elephants, tigers, ligers, orangutans, gibbons, apes and more.  To get started on your own interactive tour while helping this amazing foundation, visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - wondrous experiences which live on for a lifetime

Friday, June 28, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good sunny Friday afternoon from Myrtle Beach!  If you love animals and you're looking to make memories that you will cherish for a lifetime, you need to visit T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach.

Preservation Station at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach is a free living tiger exhibit. It is the fund raising effort for the rarest tiger on Earth, the Golden Tabby tiger. It's your chance to see the World's Rarest Tigers, up-close and un-caged for FREE. This is the opportunity of a lifetime. Come visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station and see these animals playing and relaxing in an outdoor environment. You will see Bengal tigers, Siberian tigers, Royal White Bengal tigers and the rarest tiger in the world, the Golden Tabby tiger


T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) is home to some of the world’s most famous animal actors, stars of stage and screen. This is one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  It's is a new kind of zoo that gives a fresh new look at wild animals living with man. It's a zoo that comes to you.

T.I.G.E.R.S. was founded by Dr. Bhagavan Antle. He is one of the World’s foremost trainers of big cats and other exotic animals.  Some of these animals are the rare and on the list of endangered species; Golden Tabby Tigers, Siberian & Bengal, Tigers, Panthers, Leopards, Royal White Tigers, Lions and Jaguars.  There is even one of the most unusual animals in the world, the Liger.  This Gentle Giant is over 11 foot tall and 900 lbs. and is a cross between a male lion and female tiger.  The famous Rafiki Baboons there co-Starred in Ace Ventura with Jim Carrey and in Mr. Magoo with Leslie Nelson as well as Jungle Book. Bubbles the elephant starred in Dr. Dolittle and Ace Ventura when Nature Calls.



Guests at the T..I.G.E.R.S. Preserve enjoy wondrous experiences which live on for a lifetime in the hundreds of individual and group high end professional photographs and video we take of them on this once in a lifetime journey. They leave the tour with images that only a few privileged photographers and explorers on safari have captured after years of travel; a tiger or cheetah running at full speed or swimming across a clear pool, the great apes sliding through the canopy or a large tusked elephant just a breath away. You can tell from their pictures and the letters they send us how it has changed them. This experience happens every day.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Reviews, read what others are saying!

Friday, May 24, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!!!  The staff would like to wish every one a safe and happy Memorial Day weekend!  I hope you enjoy the posts and comments you read here.  I have written about the animals; tigers, ligers, panthers, orangutans, and other exotic animals.  I've also kept you up to date on the Director, Dr. Bhagavan Antle and the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff and their efforts and dedication to  global conservation. 

Now read below what others are saying:

"T.I.G.E.R.S. was probably the most amazing experience I have had in my entire life.  
My husband and I took the VIP tour of the facility, where we got to cuddle with baby tigers, chimpanzees, gibbons, and oragantans.  It was really awesome to meet the 900 lb liger and see the adult tigers run at top speed!  We got to spend some time with Bubbles the elephant who, I learned, is the only African elephant in North America who has contact with the public.  We got to feed her carrots and watch her eat a whole watermelon!  



When you come here, you will definately want to order the photo CD and the DVD.  These are memories you will want to show off for years to come.  Also, the money you spend goes to benefit the animals, both here in the facility and in the wild.  You can feel good knowing you helped, while also having the time of your life!" - Bethany, Boston, MA

"I couldn't believe we actually got to touch these animals. One of my favorite parts of our visit to Myrtle Beach. Will be back when the kids are old enough to understand. Loved this enough to talk about it, definitely worth a try!"  - Brenda, Hendersonville, NC

"Have you ever wanted to pet or feed a tiger? Have a wolf howl at your feet. Meet an orangatang or feed an elephant? I have and now I have done all of these things! I have also witnessed how dedicated and caring the staff are. They are true animal advocates. I will be back. I would have paid more to be honest. It was that exciting. Thank you Dr Bhagavan Antle and your staff for this experience and education." - Cheryl, Enola, PA

"WOW!!! That starts to sum it up. You can have a real Bengal cub sit across your laps and have a photo with one of these beautiful cats. If you listen, it's clear that the preserve takes great care of their animals. We would love to be able to go back for a close up 3 hour tour"  - Jack, Rock Hill, SC


Take the tour of T.I.G.E.R.S. preserve where you will connect with wildlife in a very intimate way and involve yourself personally in the lives of these amazing animals. Then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org.
 

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in Myrtle Beach - Have questions?

Friday, April 26, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

It's another beautiful day in Myrtle Beach, SC!!!  Most people don't know when they visit Myrtle Beach that there is an interactive animal preserve and tour just miles down the road.   T.I.G.E.R.S.  was created as a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational, and entertaining interactive programs. Founder and Director, Dr. Bhagavan Antle works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in South America, Africa and Thailand. In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, our personnel have been involved in field research as well.

The Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve  just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.



Frequently asked questions:

Where is the tour located?

The tour is located on our 50 acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, SC. It is about 15 miles south of Barefoot Landing. Exact directions will ONLY be given to those who have tour reservations. For the privacy and safety of our animals, guests and personnel our address is not published and will not be given out.

How do I find out whether a particular day is available for the tour?
If you are looking for a particular day for the tour and would like to find out if availability still exists before you make a reservation please fill out a tour request at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com/signup or you can simply send us an email with the days you are looking for and we can let you know if we have availability that day. You can also make inquiries at our tour desk at Preservation Station.

How old do you have to be to be on the tour?
The minimum age for the tour is 6 years of age. This is due to the amount time and attention needed to really enjoy the experience of our tour and tends to be too long and contain too many necessary instructions for younger children.

How many days in advance should I book the tour?
If you are looking for a particular day, we recommend booking at least a couple weeks in advance. You can book as far in advance as you'd like and if we have availability up to the night before.

How long is the tour, when do we need to arrive and when should we expect to be done?
You have to arrive for the VIP Wild Encounter Tour at 9:15am. The Tour will begin at 10am and will end around approximately 1pm. As you will have the opportunity to look though all of the photos taken of your family/group and choose the one(s) you would like to have printed, exact time of departure will vary from group to group. If you have somewhere that you need to be after the tour and need to leave by a certain time please let our staff know and we will do our best to accommodate you.



Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Spectacular weather expected for opening day!

Friday, March 15, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  Got plans for the weekend?  The weather will be spectacular and tomorrow is THE BIG DAY.  The greatest Myrtle Beach attraction opens for the 2013 season!

There are two ways to experience the greatest hands-on, interactive wildlife encounter in the world. You can visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station, located at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach for free! Or you can take the T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounter Tour in Myrtle Beach.



Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.

This is the best way for you to support our ongoing breeding and international conservation projects and get hands on with what we do.

By attending the tour you get one comlimentary 8X10 photo per group of your choice from your tour. However we highly recommend our Photo CD.  Our Photo CD is a professional CD portfolio of you and the animals on the tour. It has each person in your group individually with the animals, your group together with the animals, candid shots of your day and photos of the animals themselves. You end up with several hundred photos that you have the right to reproduce as long as it is not for commerial puposes like ads, billboards, movie and television.

Wild Encounter Tours
5 days a week from
March 16, 2013 through October 12, 2013
Tours are on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
beginning at 10:00am and lasting approx. 3 hours.

Click here to request a Wild Encounters Tour online
OR
call 843-361-4552

Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - One of a kind Myrtle Beach Attraction

Friday, March 8, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Hi and good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in South Carolina.  Dr. Bhagavan Antle has a Myrtle Beach Safari for you to visit in Myrtle Beach.  You can see up close and personal a variety of endangered Tigers Species as well as several other endangered wildlife species.  It is a one of a kind Myrtle Beach Attraction.



Like Dr. Antle and his staff, other projects give way to vision, missions, beliefs, and efforts to save individual animals, animal populations and habitats all over the world.  See below:

YARMOUTH PORT, Mass., Feb. 14, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW- www.ifaw.org) announced today an emergency grant to rescue the last remaining 10 big cats from Riverglen Tiger Sanctuary near Mountainburg, Arkansas. The funds are being used to build temporary enclosures for the tigers at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge (TCWR), located 80 miles to the north.

Efforts to rescue the felines got underway in November of last year when the Crawford County sheriff contacted TCWR staff. The sheriff reported a total of 34 big cats including tigers, leopards and cougars housed in enclosures in such state of disrepair that it was described as a "ticking time bomb." The owner, a 72 year-old woman suffering from health complications, opted to surrender all of the animals.

"The housing conditions have deteriorated significantly and are now too insecure to contain big cats, especially tigers. It is as unsafe for the animals as it is for the public," said Kelly Donithan , IFAW Animal Rescue Officer. "We want to relocate the animals to TCWR as soon as possible so that they can be safely housed and receive the proper care they require."   

The three-month rescue operation will conclude at the end of the month when the tigers are safely crated and loaded into a rescue trailer for the trip up to Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge in Eureka Springs, AR.

"Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge is honored to have the help and support from IFAW," said Tanya Smith , TCWR President. "Together we are making a difference for each of the animals we are relocating."  

"Surprisingly, while some state regulations make big cat pet ownership difficult, keeping big cats as pets or for mere profit is generally legal in the United States," said Tracy Coppola , IFAW US Campaigns Officer.  "As a result, casualties and dangerous incidents continue to pile up."

"Adding to this problem is the fact that many unscrupulous exhibitors breed and keep baby tigers and other big cat species in order to be handled and photographed by paying customers," Coppola continued.  "After the animals grow too big, they are often sent to roadside zoos, kept in backyards, or even killed."

IFAW is working to pass the Big Cats and Public Safety Protection Act, a bill that will soon get reintroduced this Congress to phase out private possession and breeding of big cats in the U.S. and require people who currently possess them to register those animals with the USDA.

 


Since 2003, IFAW has helped rescue more than 133 tigers, lions, and other big cats from unsanctioned shelters, closing sanctuaries and other poor and unsafe living conditions in the US.

Visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the ligers and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.