T.I.G.E.R.S Changed My Life!!

Wednesday, August 6, 2014 by Friends & Supporters of T.I.G.E.R.S. Myrtle Beach
My family and I took our 1st Family Vacation down to Myrtle Beach, SC at the end of July (2014). While down there we were able to experience many of the typical "tourist" attractions that Myrtle Beach had to offer. But none of the activities we did could compare to the life-changing experience we all had when we took the tour at T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station!!
My family stayed at a time share condo near Surfside beach, and upon check-in we received several information packets in a folder to give us options of what there was to do while we were there. Inside the folder I found the pamphlet for T.I.G.E.R.S, and immediately was interested.
Once I realized that this was NOT a zoo, but a once in a lifetime opportunity to get up close with several endangered species, while also knowing that the money was going to a good foundation to help save the world, I was determined to make this adventure apart of our family's itinerary. We looked into the Barefoot Landing location where we went to take pictures with the tiger cubs, and after that my parents were convinced that taking the T.I.G.E.R.S. tour would be well worth the money.
A few days later, we all got up early and made our way to the preservation and await for what I didn't realize would be the moment when I discovered what I wanted to do with my life. The tour began at around 10AM, and for approximately 3 hours my family and myself were mesmerized by the close-up, personal encounters we experienced with such fascinating animals. Throughout the tour our wonderful tour guide Mari along with the other trainers shared several facts about the preservation, how it began, all the places that T.I.G.E.R.S travels to help around the world,and what their lifestyle is like living with the animals.
By the end of our tour my family and I had just encountered several moments that we will NEVER forget and that we were able to take home and share with others. The second I returned home I immediately went online to tigerfriends.com to look at what it takes to become an apprentice and make T.I.G.E.R.S. my own lifestyle! Now that I have the list of what to do I am starting to train myself and make the proper adjustments to my life to qualify for the apprenticeship.
I think that everyone should experience what we did on our vacation! It all was worth every penny, and I feel like the more people who can become aware of what T.I.G.E.R.S Preservation is and does for the world, the more people can spread the word and help Save the Tigers, Save the World!!

Name: Ashley McKenney
City: Brighton
State: Michigan



T.I.G.E.R.S. - Support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F.

Monday, June 9, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon everyone from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach! Where in Myrtle Beach can you experience a safari?  What attraction can you visit and feel the leathery hide of an elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, and hear the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour?   

As I was doing some research for the blog this morning, I found this article:

Tigers are Rapidly Disappearing from the Wild
According to the latest estimates, there are only about 3,200 tigers left in the wild on the entire planet. That's a catastrophically sharp decline from the 100,000 tigers that were estimated to be in the wild in 1990. The WWF experts warn that "The big cat, which is native to southern and eastern Asia, could soon become extinct unless urgent action is taken to prevent hunting and loss of habitat."

The Campaign to Double Wild Tiger Population
Countries where tigers are still found in the wild - such as China, India and Bangladesh - have made a commitment to double their numbers by 2022 (Year of the Tiger in the Chinese calendar). But following through on that pledge will be the hard part, and conservation groups are trying to put pressure on them to force them to keep their word.

We Could Lose a Top Predator
If tigers disappear (at least from the wild), we not only lose a top predator that is essential to many ecosystems, but it also means that enough habitat has been destroyed to also endanger many other species. Tiger population health is an indicator of ecosystem health in many Asian countries. by Michael Graham Richard (@Michael_GR)

Take the tour of T.I.G.E.R.S. preserve where you will connect with wildlife in a very intimate way and involve yourself personally in the lives of these amazing animals. Then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - experience a safari in Myrtle Beach

Thursday, April 24, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. where the 2014 season is under way!  Where in Myrtle Beach can you experience a safari?  What attraction can you visit and feel the leathery hide of an elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, and hear the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour?   

T.I.G.E.R.S leads the public to thrilling encounters that are both heart pounding and heart warming with the real exotic creatures who rule there.

If you have a fascination for tigers, read on...

The Golden Tabby tiger is one of the world's rarest big cats. This type of tiger became extinct in the wild in 1932 when the last two were shot in Mysore Padesh, India. From work done by us at the Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and our breeding partner Dr. Jossip Marcan we have brought back from the very edge of extinction the Golden Tabby Tiger. The Golden Tabby tiger is a white tiger with red stripes and a red saddle pattern. It has none of the black coloration of a standard Bengal tiger of a Royal White Bengal tiger. We are very proud to say that since the first birth in 1987 that their are now more than 30 Golden Tabby tigers in existence today.

Tigers are incredible growing machines. They weigh around half a pound at birth and can fit in the palm of your hand. As they begin to grow, they gain a half a pound a day, on average, for the first couple of years of their life. This means that a 1-year-old cub weighs close to 300 pounds. The small birth size of tiger babies is a great benefit for the mother tiger. Tiny babies allow mother tigers to stay in top physical condition so they can track, hunt, and kill prey as large as young elephants, small rhinos, and even buffalo a day or so before giving birth, and just a few days afterwards.

Over the last decade T.I.G.E.R.S. have donated over 200 thousand dollars, as well as time, effort and expertise, to grassroots conservation programs in Asia and Africa. The money from the Wildlife tour goes directly to help save the Endangered Wildlife Species and preserve their natural habitats.  For information about T.I.G.E.R.S. visit, www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - One of the best Myrtle Beach attractions

Friday, April 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  I hope you are having a great Friday and will have a safe weekend.

Dr. Bhagavan Antle of T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in Myrtle Beach strives to save Cheetahs.  Dr. Antle and eight exotic animal trainers from T.I.G.E.R.S along with their veterinarian Dr. Sherri Duncan, decided to go and teach the staff of Savannah Cheetah Foundation  how to train cheetahs to our lure system and make a video and photo documentary of this amazing event. Some of the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff have over twenty years experience working as professional videographers and photographers and are continually working with endangered wildlife species.  It is our hope that the sight of a beautiful cheetah pelting across the grass up close and personal both live and on DVD would help inspire their visitors and those who view the video and pictures, towards a more ecologically friendly way of life.

The Foundation was created as a breeding facility for cheetahs, and also as a place for people of all kinds to come and learn about the plight of cheetahs in the wild. Most of the visitors to the preserve are local students, many of whom have been raised with the idea that cheetahs are nuisance animals that need to be eradicated in order to protect livestock. It is to these children of Africa that the message of conservation is most essential.

We came to film and train cheetahs in a place with no name that is a mere ninety minutes drive from the airport, but is as far removed from anything resembling a city as somewhere can be.

Visit one of the best Myrtle Beach attractions, T.I.G.E.R.S. and enjoy a Myrtle Beach Safari for yourself.   

The Rare Species Fund is currently developing a program to reimburse farmers for livestock lost to wild predators, including jaguars. This initiative ensures that the predators do not become a financial liability for the farmers and are therefore less likely to be illegally poached. The RSF rewards farmers in the program who set aside a minimum of twenty percent of the land to be kept in its natural wild state. This ensures that viable habitat will remain for the jaguar as well as other indigenous wildlife, including: tapirs, monkeys, toucans, sloths, caiman and spectacled bears.

Click here for more information on T.I.G.E.R.S. and the RSF.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - 2014 season opens tomorrow!

Friday, March 14, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  Got plans for the weekend?  The weather will be spectacular and tomorrow is THE BIG DAY.  The greatest Myrtle Beach attraction opens for the 2014 season!
 
There are two ways to experience the greatest hands-on, interactive wildlife encounter in the world. You can visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station, located at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach for free! Or you can take the T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounter Tour in Myrtle Beach.


 
Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.
 
This is the best way for you to support our ongoing breeding and international conservation projects and get hands on with what we do.
 
By attending the tour you get one comlimentary 8X10 photo per group of your choice from your tour. However we highly recommend our Photo CD.  Our Photo CD is a professional CD portfolio of you and the animals on the tour. It has each person in your group individually with the animals, your group together with the animals, candid shots of your day and photos of the animals themselves. You end up with several hundred photos that you have the right to reproduce as long as it is not for commerial puposes like ads, billboards, movie and television.
 
Wild Encounter Tours
5 days a week from
March 15, 2014 through October 11, 2014
Tours are on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
Beginning at 10:00am and lasting approx. 3 hours.

Click here to request a Wild Encounters Tour online
OR
Call 843-361-4552
 
Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Opening day for the Wild Encounters Tour 2014 season is in 58 days!

Friday, January 17, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon once again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  It's getting closer and closer, the opening day for the Wild Encounters Tour 2014 season is in 58 days!  

The Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged!

Here are two of the animals you will meet:

She has a tender heart, a nice hairy shoulder to cry on - and she knows where her zoo keeps the baby wipes.

So Anjana the chimpanzee is well qualified to be a kitten-sitter.

Since orphaned puma cub Sierra turned up at the zoo, Anjana has helped her human carers with all the feeding, cuddling and chasing duties.




Anjana and Baby Cougar

Primate mum: Anjana the chimp helps zookeepers to care for orphaned puma cub, Sierra. The chimpanzee, who is five, has lived her whole life at The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species (TIGERS) in South Carolina, in the U.S..

She learned to care for little big cats while in the charge of resident feline curator China York.

Park director Dr Bhagavan Antle said: "Chimpanzees are great learners and imitators so it wasn’t long before she took on the right behaviours that were necessary to keep the kittens in line."


Anjana and cougar

Milking it: Anjana makes sure Sierra gets fed and even knows where the wet wipes are kept

"If Sierra is running around too fast then Anjana will scoop her up and make sure she doesn’t get into any trouble."

Anjana has already helped to bring up two royal white tiger cubs, a leopard and four lions. Dr Antle added: "She is a great assistant. If you need a baby wipe you can just tell her and she’ll run off and get it."


Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.
 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Wildlife ambassadors

Tuesday, January 7, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good day and Happy New Year from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  It's 2014 and the Wild Encounters tour begins March 16!  

T.I.G.E.R.S. was created as a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational, and entertaining interactive programs. Director Bhagavan Antle works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in South America, Africa and Thailand. In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, our personnel have been involved in field research as well.

Doc Antle is widely recognized as one of the foremost animal trainers in the world, having worked with thousands of animals. He travels the globe promoting the education and conservation of some of our planet's most rare and endangered species. Among these is, of course, the white tiger.

Most people do not realize that we are in the midst of a mass extinction that is affecting every living thing on this planet. We are losing up to a dozen species of plant and animal every day. This rate is far faster than when the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. A stunningly beautiful animal like a tiger captures people's attention so they become more willing to learn about critical conservation issues. Tigers are an important living example of the environmental problems facing the world, which makes them the perfect wildlife ambassadors. Wild tigers are currently on the brink of extinction. Due to rampant habitat destruction and poaching we may be losing a tiger a day.

The unique colors of certain tigers attract an even greater amount of public attention. Therefore, Royal white and golden tabby tigers assume a more important role as ambassadors for conservation issues. Doc Antle and the staff of T.I.G.E.R.S. has found that after an up-close, uncaged experience with these tigers, people are willing to learn about the increasing global issues and possible solutions to save our planet's biodiversity.
 


Many tiger conservation programs have focused their funding on the five remaining subspecies of tigers: Siberian, Indochinese, South Chinese, Sumatran, and Bengal. However, recent genetic evidence suggests that there are only two truly unique subspecies or types of tigers, Sumatran and Bengal. This should allow for a more unified conservation effort for tigers by eliminating the thinking that created a division in which conservation programs were more about National borders than about the Big Cats themselves.
 


Dr. Antle having has also worked with The RSF (Rare Species Fund) and thousands of animals and even in Hollywood on such films as Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls and Forrest Gump.  He has also contributed to Matabeleland Leopard and Cheetah project in Zimbabwe, the Savannah Cheetah Foundation in South Africa and Samutprakam Wildlife Park in Thailand.

If you want to join Doc Antle and T.I.G.E.R.S. in conservation, visit the website for more information on how you can help.
 

Big Cat T.I.G.E.R.S. - Big Cat Safety, Handling and Training

Friday, December 6, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

It's a beautiful day at T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  I hope you all caught the episode on Nat Geo last Friday Night.  T.I.G.E.R.S. was featured on an episode of Big Cat Week.

And now, an interesting article I found:

Big Cat Safety, Handling and Training

By Dr. Bhagavan Antle, Director at T.I.G.E.R.S.

These are just some of my observations over the last 24 years as I have trained some 400 big cats and met hundreds more. By big cats, I only mean the Panthera family (lions, tigers, leopard, jaguars and hybrids) all the rest are in a different category and the small cats (including cheetah and pumas) are in a different class. They will kill you, but it is not with the same intent and aggressive behavior. Male lions are 100 times harder to train than tigers.

What is training?

Training is bridging the gap between what you want the animal to do and getting him to do it. It is the language that you use to talk to animals if you want them to do something. A animal is not trained unless it will do basic behaviors regularly and repeatedly without trouble.

Behavior in response to command is a language you create. This language allows you to communicate with big cats. Without this language put in place, you have random communication with the cat and safety is precarious.

Many people try to "train" cats with food. This type of reward system creates a food drive that if used improperly can lead to and create a dangerous response. If you are working a cat outside of a cage like this, when no food is available, you are no longer in control. You can bridge certain behaviors with food, but you must then do them without, to assure the behavior is solid. A trained cat will walk into a strange place and do what you want when you want because you ask it, not because you feed it.

 

What constitutes a trained big cat?

Being able to have a cat walk over to you after you open the door and lay down at your feet and then allow you to make contact is the beginning of a safe relationship. Having the cat stay in the cage with the door open until you request it to exit is essential to safety.

Trained cats will sit, come, stay, steady, back up, lay down, go to, get on etc... just like a trained obedience dog will. Trained cats will do this regularly and repeatedly, inside or outside of the cage without food rewards. A trained cat will climb onto a seat or table 5 to 10 times in a row without breaking down.

One of the first things our more than 50 lions, tigers, leopards, liger's and jaguars are trained to do, is come out of a door or gate, in response to us calling their name. These animals are in groups of up to 10 or more, they have to wait their turn, and not push past any opening. Most of them have to do this 2 x a day as they are taken in from multi acre habitats, and brought into the main house for care, observation and feeding with full contact with the trainers the whole time.

A cat that you fool around with in a cage or through a cage is not trained. Without solid behaviors that are regular and repeatable you are at risk. The only sure way you know what the animal will do is when it does what you ask repeatedly.

There will be more of this article in future posts.



Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Super Cat !

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Last week I posted information on the White Tiger, one of the bigs cats that. will be featured on Big The National Geographic Channel November 29th.  The episode, called Super Cat will be aired this coming Friday night during Big Cat Week!!!

So for this week, here is some interesting information about Golden Tabby Tigers:



Millions of years ago, tigers roamed all over Asia. Tigers originally existed in Northern China, ranging into Siberia, where they grew to an enormous size, weighing as much as 700 pounds and standing over 8 feet tall. They survived by hunting prey which included wild boar, grizzly bears, and they even fished salmon from the rivers. But during the last great ice age, tigers were forced to migrate as far south as the island of Bali and as far west as the Caspian sea. During this great migration the tiger went through many changes, adapting to its new habitats.

The tigers made other adaptations as well. Besides changing in size, they changed in color. Many people do not realize this, but tigers once came in many colors just like house cats. Tigers could be jet-black, snow-white, royal white, and even tabby in color. These unique colors were the first to disappear as tigers were hunted to near extinction.

The Golden Tabby tiger is one of the world's rarest big cats. This type of tiger became extinct in the wild in 1932 when the last two were shot in Mysore Padesh, India. From work done by us at the Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and our breeding parnter Dr. Jossip Marcan we have brought back from the very edge of extinction the Golden Tabby Tiger. The Golden Tabby tiger is a white tiger with red stripes and a red saddle pattern. It has none of the black coloration of a standard Bengal tiger of a Royal White Bengal tiger. We are very proud to say that since the first birth in 1987 that their are now more than 30 Golden Tabby tigers in existence today.

Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S - Best Friends Fur-Ever

Friday, October 11, 2013 by Suzanne Burns




This Baby Monkey, Lion and Tiger Are Best Friends Fur-Ever

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach!  The tour for this season is coming to a close very soon but the staff of professional trainers live with the animals 24/7, year-round.  

Some think it is dangerous to get so close to wild animals like these, but the handlers here at T.I.G.E.R.S. have been with these animals since they were cubs and have developed a special friendship based on love and respect. In fact, Dr. Antle and his partner Kheira have actually delivered many of the cubs in the enclosure with the mothers because of their special relationships.

T.I.G.E.R.S. has a proven method of training these animals: Never treat them as pets, lots of tender loving care, and thousands of hours of one-on-one handling create special relationships.

One such relationship is not between trainer and animal, but between two unlikely animal friends:

Vali the 16-month-old chimp and Bam Bam the 5-month-old grizzly bear made fast friends at Myrtle Beach Safari park, where they put their differences aside to play, cuddle, and more or less, melt our hearts.

The pair were introduced after the South Carolina's park staff realized they were about the same size. "We got them out there playing on a sunny day, and they went on and on for hours," said Park owner Bhagavan Antle. "Neither of them wanted to quit."

After all, not much can slow these buddies down. "They would both lie down and fall asleep at our feet, wake back up and start wrestling again," added Antle.

And that's a routine that repeats itself every single day, species aside.

"Bam Bam ultimately has more power," Antle said, "but Vali tricks him and can constantly get behind him. He will throw things at Bam Bam and run around him in circles."
- peoplepets.com - Barry Bland/Rex USA

Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve - Experience this Wildlife presentation

Friday, August 30, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Hi and good Friday afternoon from TIGERS Preserve in South Carolina.  Dr. Bhagavan Antle has an attraction for you to visit in Myrtle Beach.  You can see up close and personal a variety of endangered Tiger Species as well as several other endangered wildlife species.  It is a one of a kind Animal Preserve in Myrtle Beach.  



Doc is a conservationist who trains the animals to become “animal ambassadors.” Doc and his team of highly skilled animal trainers spend just about every waking hour working with these magnificent beasts. As animal ambassadors, their role is to make an emotional connection with whom they come in contact. Hopefully, they will impact members of the public enough to encourage them to help fight species extinction.  

The tigers, lions, panthers, wolves, apes and elephants are well protected, loved, and fed, cared for and adored. No animal poachers or rainforest-destroying palm oil companies could kill or displace them as long as they are here.



Experience this Wildlife presentation with the world's rarest big cats.  At T.I.G.E.R.S you will observe and learn about many rare and unique animals, in a new and completely different way. You will not see our animals sleeping or pacing in cages, as you may find in "traditional" zoos. Instead you will have a look at some of the most magnificent creatures on Earth up close and uncaged you can see and photograph the animals climbing and jumping and doing all the natural activities they would normally do in the wild.  

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve. All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - New carnivore species discovered this week.

Friday, August 16, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good rainy Friday to all from T.I.G.E.R.S. VIP Tour in Myrtle Beach!!   Dr. Bhagavan Antle has an animal preserve in Myrtle Beach for you to visit.  You can get up close and personal a variety of rare and endangered Species.  It is a one of a kind Myrtle Beach Attraction.

Speaking of rare species, in the news this week:



First new carnivore species in 35 years discovered

After years of sleuthing, the Smithsonian has identified a new species of carnivore. The olinguito is a rust-colored, furry mammal that lives in the treetops of the Andes Mountains and weighs two pounds, making it the most petite member of the raccoon family.

A team led by Smithsonian zoologist Kristofer M. Helgen spent years examining hundreds of museum specimens and tracking animals in the wild in the cloud forests of Ecuador. The result? It identified a new species of mammal, the olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina). The discovery corrects a case of mistaken identity. For decades, scientists thought the olinguito was an olingo, a larger member of the raccoon family, or another mammal. -Mark Gurney, washingtonpost.com


Another source described the new finding:

Native to the high, misty cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, the olinguito is the smallest member of the raccoon family, according to Kristofer Helgen, a Smithsonian scientist who recognized it as a distinct species 10 years ago.

They have thick, woolly fur that is brighter than that of the more drab-colored Olingos. Olinguitos are about 2.5 feet (.76 meter) long and weigh about 2 pounds (900 grams). Males and females are about the same size, and females raise a single baby at a time, the scientists said.

Olinguitos are hard to spot in the cloud forests of the northern Andes, which are thickly wooded and often shrouded in fog or mist with elevations of 5,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level. Largely nocturnal, they spend most of their time in the forest canopy and are adept at jumping from tree to tree. -
chicagotribune.com

Visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the ligers and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - experience a safari in Myrtle Beach!

Friday, June 21, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  Where in Myrtle Beach can you experience a safari?  What attraction can you visit and feel the leathery hide of an elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, and hear the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour?  



T.I.G.E.R.S will lead the public to thrilling encounters that are both heart pounding and heart warming with the real exotic creatures who rule there.

If you have a fascination for tigers, read on...

The Golden Tabby tiger is one of the world's rarest big cats. This type of tiger became extinct in the wild in 1932 when the last two were shot in Mysore Padesh, India. From work done by us at the Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and our breeding parnter Dr. Jossip Marcan we have brought back from the very edge of extinction the Golden Tabby Tiger. The Golden Tabby tiger is a white tiger with red stripes and a red saddle pattern. It has none of the black coloration of a standard Bengal tiger of a Royal White Bengal tiger. We are very proud to say that since the first birth in 1987 that their are now more than 30 Golden Tabby tigers in existence today.

Tigers are incredible growing machines. They weigh around half a pound at birth and can fit in the palm of your hand. As they begin to grow, they gain a half a pound a day, on average, for the first couple of years of their life. This means that a 1-year-old cub weighs close to 300 pounds. The small birth size of tiger babies is a great benefit for the mother tiger. Tiny babies allow mother tigers to stay in top physical condition so they can track, hunt, and kill prey as large as young elephants, small rhinos, and even buffalo a day or so before giving birth, and just a few days afterwards.

Tigers have far superior teeth to those of the other members of the big cat family including the lion, leopard and jaguar. Not only do they have a sharpened peg of a tooth but their teeth narrow down to a razor sharp edge at the back making the tigers bite much more lethal. Armed with these incredible teeth, tigers are able to bring down prey as large a grizzly bears, rhinocerous and even small elephants and they do this all on their own. Lions are able to hunt large prey but they usually have to do it in groups, called prides.

To learn more about T.I.G.E.R.S, and the animals, visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Preservation Station gets a mention at usatoday.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station!  Are you looking for some fun in Myrtle Beach?  Our area has so much to offer, the options are endless.  Do you like free stuff?


I was doing some research for the blog this morning and found this article on usatoday.com.  check it out, it mentions Myrtle Beach's favorite animal attraction!:

Vacation expenses often add up much quicker than travelers imagine, thanks to airfares, baggage fees, the cost of gas, hotel rooms and eating out. But being on a restricted budget doesn't mean you can't enjoy what a city has to offer. Many highly appealing destinations have enticing no-cost entertainment options. Here are some of our favorite cities for free activities.

Myrtle Beach: Fireworks, music, tigers and time travel

The Atlantic coast is where much of the Southeast goes to play in summer, and there are plenty of free things to do in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Start on The Boardwalk, a 1.2 mile-long promenade with ocean views and superb people watching. The Boardwalk's also where you'll find an amazing lineup of free festivals, carnivals and concerts, all part of the city's Hot Summer Nights program.

On Wednesday nights, Myrtle Beach celebrates Hump Day with a 9:30 p.m. fireworks show at the 2nd Avenue Pier. Another free fireworks show caps each Tuesday evening in summer, thanks to Broadway at the Beach, where warm-weather concerts are also held at no charge.

Show your stripes with a visit to T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station at Barefoot Landing, Myrtle Beach's amazing yet free wildlife exhibit and tiger museum, where you can watch Bengal, Siberian, Royal White Bengal and Golden Tabby tigers playing in their own outdoor environment.

T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and operate four public education exhibits; Two "Preservation Stations" in Myrtle Beach, SC, "Wild Encounters" located at Jungle Island in Miami, FL as well as yearly productions in the Boston, MA area of the highly acclaimed show "The Tale of the Tiger".


At our Preservation Stations, the wildlife ambassadors; the great apes, big cats, elephant and a stunning group of other highly interactive animal ambassadors, offer our guests a collection of experiences that can be life changing. While at the preserves, the participants senses are awakened to a whole new world; feeling the leathery hide of our elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, the sweet smell of a binturong and the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour. Our visitors see animals they know and love displaying their spectacular natural talents and have encounters with new ones they never even knew existed. During these encounters our guests connect with wildlife in a very intimate way which personally involves them in the lives of these amazing animals. They then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Facts about this Myrtle Beach Attraction

Friday, May 31, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon once again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  In case you have never read this blog, here are some facts about this Myrtle Beach Attraction:

The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species is a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational and entertaining interactive programs. Our animal ambassadors are important living examples of current worldwide environmental issues, helping us teach people about the importance of conservation and global biodiversity. T.I.G.E.R.S. also works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in Africa and Thailand. In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, our personnel have been involved in field research as well. Our TIGERS Preservation Stations help make all of this possible as we entertain and educate the public about the importance of wildlife and our environment.



T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) is home to some of the world’s most famous animal actors, stars of stage and screen. Here we have one of the most exciting animal adventures ever. This is a new kind of zoo that gives a fresh new look at wild animals living with man. It's a zoo that comes to you.

Dr. Bhagavan "Doc" Antle is the founder and director of T.I.G.E.R.S., The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and the R.S.F., The Rare Species Fund. He grew up on a vast cattle ranch in Arizona, where his great love for wild and exotic animals began and from a very young age he began raising and caring for every amazing animal he could get his hands on. As a young man he had many great opportunities to travel and explore the world and this eventually brought him to China where he studied for and received his Doctoral degree in medicine. He then interned as a traveling Doctor throughout many villages in mainland China and other parts of Asia. He returned to the United States in the early 80's and located in Buckingham, Virginia, where he co-created and ran Integral Health Services; an alternative drugless therapy clinic utilizing meditation, diet and exercise programs.



In 1982, the clinic was visited by a zoo director who introduced Doc to a Siberian tiger cub. He was so amazed by the presence of the tiger that he asked if he might use it at the end of one of his lectures, to demonstrate how even the most powerful animals were greatly affected by their environment. The presentation was a great success and after it was over an impressed audience member introduced himself as the local head of Exxon Oil. He asked Doc if he would present the tiger and his message of the dangers of environmental damage at an upcoming Exxon Convention. Needless to say, they were blown away and an amazing partnership was born between Doc Antle and the big cats of the world. T.I.G.E.R.S. was soon created as a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational, and entertaining interactive programs. It's animal ambassadors are important living examples of current worldwide environmental issues, helping to educate the world about the importance of conservation and global biodiversity. Today, Doc is widely recognized as one of the foremost animal trainers in the world, having worked with thousands of animals, and traveled the globe promoting the education and conservation of some of our planet's most rare and endangered species.

For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Info on Doc and the RSF

Friday, May 17, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  I hope you are having a great Friday and will have a safe weekend.

Dr. Bhagavan Antle of T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in Myrtle Beach strives to save Cheetahs.  Dr. Antle and eight exotic animal trainers from T.I.G.E.R.S along with their veterinarian Dr. Sherri Duncan, decided to go and teach the staff of Savannah Cheetah Foundation  how to train cheetahs to our lure system and make a video and photo documentary of this amazing event. Some of the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff have over twenty years experience working as professional videographers and photographers and are continually working with endangered wildlife species.  It is our hope that the sight of a beautiful cheetah pelting across the grass up close and personal both live and on DVD would help inspire their visitors and those who view the video and pictures, towards a more ecologically friendly way of life.

The Foundation was created as a breeding facility for cheetahs, and also as a place for people of all kinds to come and learn about the plight of cheetahs in the wild. Most of the visitors to the preserve are local students, many of whom have been raised with the idea that cheetahs are nuisance animals that need to be eradicated in order to protect livestock. It is to these children of Africa that the message of conservation is most essential.



We came to film and train cheetahs in a place with no name that is a mere ninety minutes drive from the airport, but is as far removed from anything resembling a city as somewhere can be.

Visit one of the best Myrtle Beach attractions, T.I.G.E.R.S. and enjoy a Myrtle Beac Safari for yourself.  



The Rare Species Fund is currently developing a program to reimburse farmers for livestock lost to wild predators, including jaguars. This initiative ensures that the predators do not become a financial liability for the farmers and are therefore less likely to be illegally poached. The RSF rewards farmers in the program who set aside a minimum of twenty percent of the land to be kept in its natural wild state. This ensures that viable habitat will remain for the jaguar as well as other indigenous wildlife, including: tapirs, monkeys, toucans, sloths, caiman and spectacled bears.

 

Click here for more information on T.I.G.E.R.S. and the RSF.

 

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach - Opposites attract

Friday, April 12, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Hello again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Some say opposites attract but what about an orangutan being friends with a dog?  Is it even possible?  With Suryia and Roscoe it is!


When Suryia the orangutan first met Roscoe, a stray dog, they become best friends from the start.  The two became friends when they crossed paths at T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve.  The blue tick hound was immediately spotted by the orangutan who ambled over to make friends.

Founder and Director, Doc Antle said: 'Roscoe looked really thin and a little lost so we fed him and took care of him; 'He followed us through the gate and ran over and found Suryia. As soon as he saw Roscoe, Suryia ran over to him and they started playing. It was unusual because dogs are usually scared of primates but they took to each other straight away. We made a few calls to see if he belonged to anyone and when no-one came forward, Roscoe ended up staying. Now they swim together, play together and Suryia even takes the dog for his walks.

Sounds amazing!  here's a news item from just this week about other animal friends."

From abcnews.go.com
At Noah’s Ark, a wild-animal rescue center in Georgia, the “BLT” are an unlikely trio that even “Oz’s” Dorothy would find hard to fear.

“It’s a lion, a tiger and a bear — oh my!” said Allison Hedgecoth of Noah’s Ark. “They live together and they don’t see their differences. They don’t see their color differences.”

In a small pen, Baloo (an American black bear), Leo (the lion) and Shere Kahn (a Bengal tiger) cuddle, play ball, chase each other around, eat cookies daily and seem to have forged a friendship for life.

“It’s kind of unusual because black bears and tigers would be solitary as adults,” said Rebecca Snyder, a curator of animals at Atlanta’s zoo.

The three predators were rescued as cubs 12 years ago from drug dealers who’d abused and neglected them.

“All of them had issues,” Hedgecoth said. “Leo, the lion, had a big raw spot on his nose. Baloo, the bear, had an ingrown harness where his owners hadn’t lengthened it as he grew, so it actually grew into the skin and it had to be surgically removed. … They have recovered more than 100 percent.”

But when trainers tried to separate the animals, they acted out. For years, trainers said they worried and waited for fights but had witnessed nothing but peace among the three.

Hedgecoth said she didn’t know how the trio had managed to get along together so well and for so long.

 


“I think that the ordeal they went through as youngsters really bonded them together,” she told ABC News. “That’s all that they had. They only had each other for comfort.”

She said separating them now, after more than a decade together, would be “cruel.”

“There definitely is something special going on between the three of them,” she said. “That is definitely a lesson.”


Guests also enjoy wondrous experiences which live on for a lifetime in the hundreds of individual and group high end professional photographs and video we take of them on this once in a lifetime journey. They leave Preservation Station with images that only a few privileged photographers and explorers on safari have captured after years of travel; a tiger or cheetah running at full speed or swimming across a clear pool, the great apes sliding through the canopy or a large tusked elephant just a breath away. You can tell from their pictures and the letters they send us how it has changed them. This experience happens every day.

 Please join in the worldwide education and conservation efforts at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach - Are you looking for something "different" to do this weekend?

Friday, April 5, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach.  I hope you had a nice Easter Holiday and are enjoying Spring Break!!!  Are you looking for something "different" to do this weekend?  I urge you to visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation at Barefoot Landing or take the T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounters Tour, located south of Myrtle Beach.  

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach is a free living tiger exhibit. It is the fund raising effort for the rarest tiger on Earth, the Golden Tabby tiger. Here is your chance to see the World's Rarest Tigers, up-close and un-caged for FREE.

The Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged!



How much do you know about Tigers?

Pregnancy in the tiger:

Pregnancy in tigers is not obvious to the eye for the first two and half months, but in the last 10-12 days becomes detectable by the bulging abdominal area.

During the later part of pregnancy a wild tigress is particularly vulnerable to attack and starvation. Unlike the lioness, the tigress has no one to help hunt for food and evolution has helped overcome her vulnerabilities by making the duration of pregnancy brief.
Tiger gestation:

The gestation period for tigers is 100 days, but ranges from 93 to 111 days. After this time she will give birth to a litter of between 1 and 7 blind cubs, the norm being 2 to 4.

In two extreme cases 7 cubs were recorded as being born in captivity, while a tigress was sighted in the wild with 5 cubs, all of similar age; these may well be record births.


Preparation for birth:

Wild females give birth once every 2 to 2.5 years. The interval between births is approximately three to four years, though should a litter of newborns die, a tigress is quite capable of producing another litter within only five months.

The cubs will be born in an area of heavy cover; this may be a cave, long grass, thick bushes, an overhanging rock, or a hollow log. Anywhere that won't flood, provides protection, shelter and a good degree of concealment will suit the purpose.  - Source: www.lairweb.org

 

Whether it's this weekend or later on, I urge you to visit both of these Myrtle Beach Attractions.  All proceeds from Preservation Station and the TIGERS Tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.  For more info, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Spectacular weather expected for opening day!

Friday, March 15, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  Got plans for the weekend?  The weather will be spectacular and tomorrow is THE BIG DAY.  The greatest Myrtle Beach attraction opens for the 2013 season!

There are two ways to experience the greatest hands-on, interactive wildlife encounter in the world. You can visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station, located at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach for free! Or you can take the T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounter Tour in Myrtle Beach.



Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.

This is the best way for you to support our ongoing breeding and international conservation projects and get hands on with what we do.

By attending the tour you get one comlimentary 8X10 photo per group of your choice from your tour. However we highly recommend our Photo CD.  Our Photo CD is a professional CD portfolio of you and the animals on the tour. It has each person in your group individually with the animals, your group together with the animals, candid shots of your day and photos of the animals themselves. You end up with several hundred photos that you have the right to reproduce as long as it is not for commerial puposes like ads, billboards, movie and television.

Wild Encounter Tours
5 days a week from
March 16, 2013 through October 12, 2013
Tours are on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
beginning at 10:00am and lasting approx. 3 hours.

Click here to request a Wild Encounters Tour online
OR
call 843-361-4552

Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - One of a kind Myrtle Beach Attraction

Friday, March 8, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Hi and good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in South Carolina.  Dr. Bhagavan Antle has a Myrtle Beach Safari for you to visit in Myrtle Beach.  You can see up close and personal a variety of endangered Tigers Species as well as several other endangered wildlife species.  It is a one of a kind Myrtle Beach Attraction.



Like Dr. Antle and his staff, other projects give way to vision, missions, beliefs, and efforts to save individual animals, animal populations and habitats all over the world.  See below:

YARMOUTH PORT, Mass., Feb. 14, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW- www.ifaw.org) announced today an emergency grant to rescue the last remaining 10 big cats from Riverglen Tiger Sanctuary near Mountainburg, Arkansas. The funds are being used to build temporary enclosures for the tigers at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge (TCWR), located 80 miles to the north.

Efforts to rescue the felines got underway in November of last year when the Crawford County sheriff contacted TCWR staff. The sheriff reported a total of 34 big cats including tigers, leopards and cougars housed in enclosures in such state of disrepair that it was described as a "ticking time bomb." The owner, a 72 year-old woman suffering from health complications, opted to surrender all of the animals.

"The housing conditions have deteriorated significantly and are now too insecure to contain big cats, especially tigers. It is as unsafe for the animals as it is for the public," said Kelly Donithan , IFAW Animal Rescue Officer. "We want to relocate the animals to TCWR as soon as possible so that they can be safely housed and receive the proper care they require."   

The three-month rescue operation will conclude at the end of the month when the tigers are safely crated and loaded into a rescue trailer for the trip up to Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge in Eureka Springs, AR.

"Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge is honored to have the help and support from IFAW," said Tanya Smith , TCWR President. "Together we are making a difference for each of the animals we are relocating."  

"Surprisingly, while some state regulations make big cat pet ownership difficult, keeping big cats as pets or for mere profit is generally legal in the United States," said Tracy Coppola , IFAW US Campaigns Officer.  "As a result, casualties and dangerous incidents continue to pile up."

"Adding to this problem is the fact that many unscrupulous exhibitors breed and keep baby tigers and other big cat species in order to be handled and photographed by paying customers," Coppola continued.  "After the animals grow too big, they are often sent to roadside zoos, kept in backyards, or even killed."

IFAW is working to pass the Big Cats and Public Safety Protection Act, a bill that will soon get reintroduced this Congress to phase out private possession and breeding of big cats in the U.S. and require people who currently possess them to register those animals with the USDA.

 


Since 2003, IFAW has helped rescue more than 133 tigers, lions, and other big cats from unsanctioned shelters, closing sanctuaries and other poor and unsafe living conditions in the US.

Visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the ligers and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.