T.I.G.E.R.S. - Close friends of different species

Friday, July 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon everyone from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  If you read my posts, you know animals can become very close with members of another species.
 
Like most youngsters, their play can get a little wild. But five-month-old grizzly bear Bam Bam and 16-month-old chimpanzee Vali are the most unlikely friends.

For while together they resemble a pair of cuddly toys, they would normally live on different continents.

And when they grow up, Bam Bam is likely to be about nine times the size of his chimp pal. But the young males have been inseparable since being introduced at the Myrtle Beach Safari park in South Carolina, where they were born.

Visitors delight in watching them wrestling and playing tag. In the wild, Bam Bam would live in the wilds of North America, while Vali’s natural home is the jungle of central Africa.

Park owner Bhagavan Antle said staff decided to see whether the pair would hit it off when Bam Bam reached the same size as Vali – even though bears grow much faster than chimps.

‘We got them out there playing on a sunny day and they went on and on for hours,’ he said. ‘Neither of them wanted to quit. They would lie down and fall asleep at our feet, wake back up and start wrestling again.’

 Dr Antle added: ‘Bam Bam has more power, but Vali tricks him. He will throw things at Bam Bam and run around him in circles.’

When the pair aren’t together, energetic Vali likes to help out his mum, while Bam Bam prefers a slower pace of life.


Staff are not sure how long the friendship will last as Bam Bam will quickly grow into a 56st adult bear, while Vali will reach only 9st

‘He likes nothing better than a bowl of sweet potatoes and chicken mash,’ added Dr Antle.

Staff at the safari park now wonder whether the friendship can last. An adult grizzly can weigh up to 56st, while a mature male chimp tips the scales at just 9st.
Staff are not sure how long the friendship will last as Bam Bam will quickly grow into a 56st adult bear, while Vali will reach only 9st.

By Amy Oliver dailymail.co.uk/Photo by Barry Bland

Over the last decade T.I.G.E.R.S. have donated over 200 thousand dollars, as well as time, effort and expertise, to grassroots conservation programs in Asia and Africa. The money from the Wildlife tour goes directly to help save the Endangered Wildlife Species and preserve their natural habitats.  For information about T.I.G.E.R.S. visit, www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

My Dream

Friday, July 11, 2014 by Friends & Supporters of T.I.G.E.R.S. Myrtle Beach
My whole life I have absolutely adored and admired these beautiful large cats in every way possible, from their amazing abilities to their out standing beauty and personalities they are truly magnificent creatures that i would absolutely love to spend the rest of my life with. Although I'm only 14 years old I truly do believe that what my future holds will be an amazing journey for me. My dream is to open up a place just like yours and make sure that these incredible animals will always have a place to call home. In the future I truly want to make sure that all of these beautiful cats r going to be able to walk this earth for many many more years than i ever will. I have been doing much research on different large cat species and recently looked into the variety of tiger species only to find that three have already been extinct. Its just not fair what we humans are doing to these poor innocent animals, poaching has become such a large problem in some parts of the world and why do people even poach?, for money that will end up eventually going to waist. I really would love to become apart of these cats lives. I have already started a little business of my own to raise money for these cats and am hopping one day i can truly make a difference in this world. I am working on expanding my business into something bigger. My goal right now is to raise at least $1000:00 for these big cats but I'm still not sure where to donate it. Surely after looking at your website and what you guys have done you will definitely be on the top of my donation list. Im just a teenage girl trying to make a difference in the world, and i truly believe that one day i will. Also i would one day love to work at the myrtle beach safari with all you incredible and truly amazing people and of course all the wonderful and loving animals. Maybe when i am older i will have that choice, but for now starting off small doesn't hurt. Keep me in mind for job opportunities in a few years. It would truly make me the happiest girl on earth. ~lots of love ,
Samantha.A.Vlachos

Name: samantha vlachos
City: maple ontario (Toronto)
State: canada

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Who says you need to go to Africa for a Safari?

Friday, July 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!

Who says you need to go to Africa for a Safari?

T.I.G.E.R.S. is home to some of the world's most famous animal actors, stars of stage and screen. Dr. Bhagavan "Doc" Antle is the founder and director of T.I.G.E.R.S. and The Rare Species Fund. While growing up on a vast cattle ranch in Arizona, Doc raised and cared for every amazing wild and exotic animal he could get his hands on. His passion took him to mainland China and other parts of Asia where he studied for and received his doctoral degree in medicine.

He returned to the United States in the early 80's and created an alternative drugless therapy clinic utilizing meditation, diet and exercise programs. In 1982, Doc was introduced to a Siberian tiger cub by a zoo director. Doc was so amazed by the presence of the tiger that he asked if he might use the tiger at the end of one of his lectures to demonstrate how even the most powerful animals were greatly affected by their environment. One of the impressed audience members was the local head of Exxon Oil who invited Doc to present the tiger and his message outlining the dangers of environmental damage at an upcoming Exxon Convention. Needless to say they were blown away and an amazing partnership was born between Doc Antle and the big cats of the world.

Today, Doc is widely recognized as one of the foremost animal trainers in the world, having worked with thousands of animals, and traveled the globe promoting the education and conservation of some of our planet's most rare and endangered species.

Learn more about conservation efforts for tigers, ligers, elephants, orangutans, gibbons, apes and more. Visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com/signup to get started on your own interactive tour while helping this amazing foundation!

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The world's first ever white lion-tiger hybrids

Friday, June 27, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Welcome again and good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  The tour and Preservation Station are in full swing!  If you're a regular reader here, you know we often talk about our amazing LIGER, a cross between a Lion and a White Tiger.  

These five-month-old liger cubs are the nephews of Hercules, pictured below, the official Guinness Book of World Records largest cat on the planet! The four male liger cubs are the first ever to be born from a white male lion and a white female tiger, making them the world's most unique big cats. 

The four brothers named Yeti, Odlin, Sampson, and Apollo are the world's first ever white lion-tiger hybrids. Their parents are the famous wildlife ambassadors, Ivory and Saraswati, at Jungle Island in Miami, FL. Ivory and Saraswati met each other at the Myrtle Beach Safari in Myrtle Beach, SC. There are only around 300 white lions and 1,200 white tigers left in the world, so the cubs' father and mother are extremely rare in their own right. Ivory is a white African lion and Saraswati is a snow white Bengal tiger.

These adorable cubs may look unassuming but they could grow to be the biggest cats in the world averaging a weight gain of one pound per day! A liger is just what it sounds like, a cross between a male lion and tigress. There are around 1,000 ligers in the world but none of them are white.

According to Dr. Antle, Yeti (pictured on far left) is the biggest and most boisterous, pushing past his smaller brothers and wanting to be the center of attention. Doc says he is sure Yeti will reach the size of his Uncle Hercules, if not larger. "I am convinced Yeti will make the Guinness Book of Records. He's so big already - has such a big, fat head and paws. All the cubs grow so quickly but Yeti is already so much bigger". Apollo is the smallest and behaves more like a house kitten, purring all the time and demanding to be stroked. Ligers tend to enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers and are sociable like lions.  

"We've had everyone from Congressman to people from all walks of life get on planes to fly in to see such an incredibly unique sight", says Doc Antle, "they have such a beautiful creamy color that I have never seen on a cat before".

*Thank you to Lucy Osborne and the UK Daily Mail Online for their help in this publication.*

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve and T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation  Station were created as a wildlife education organization dedicated to promoting global conservation. With informative, educational and entertaining interactive programs, Dr. Bhagavan Antle has created a once-in-a-lifetime experience! Dr. Antle, Director of T.I.G.E.R.S., works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in North America, South America, Africa and Southeast Asia.   To make reservations over the phone, please call 843.855.2699 or click here.

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station - Read what others are saying...

Wednesday, June 25, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Did you know there is a FREE living tiger museum located inside Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach, SC?  It offers families the opportunity to see tigers up close, through glass, absolutely free of charge.

Read what others are saying about T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station:

“Wow is an understatement!”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 7, 2014 via mobile

We took our 2 grown daughters(22 &23) and we all had a great time. We were amazed at how many animals we got to hold and interact with. I smiled so much in the 3 hrs we were there that my face hurt when we left. Well worth the money. We bought the pictures and got a cd with almost 500 pics of our day. Definitely something to experience with your family. - M. Chinun

 “Loved it”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 19, 2014 NEW

I saw this and had to go . We got out picture taken with a tiger cub & a baby chimp.  My kids loved seeing all of the tigers. - smjones Edgewoor,  KY

“Wonderful Experience”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 18, 2014 NEW

We saw the ad somewhere and decided while at Barefoot Landing to go get our pictures with a tiger. I have been obsessed with chimpanzees since I was very young, so I was thrilled to see the option to take a picture with one. I was apprehensive bc I do not agree with animals being used for entertainment but once I witnessed with operation and the animals' owners, I became more comfortable.  The trainers/owners were very knowledgeable. I plan on returning to do the tour once I can without the entire family. If you are a true animal lover then I highly recommend it. My mother went and she isnt the biggest on animals, especially touching them but one hug from the chimp youngster was all it took for her to fall in love. - T. Tyler Roanoke, VA

“Great Experience!”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 8, 2014

Once in a lifetime experience. You get to interact with the animals.  Wonderful! We will definitely do the full safari next time, we only got to do the pics with the tiger and the monkey. The staff is very friendly. - Kim D. Woburn, MA

For those interested in meeting a tiger or an ape in person, we offer (for a fee)the opportunity to pose with one of the animal ambassadors for a photo. The animals spend only a couple hours per day, in the late afternoon, at T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station and funding generated from our photos and gift shop sales help support various wildlife conservation projects we conduct worldwide through our Rare Species Fund. We are open from mid-March to mid-October and hours of operation can be found by visiting our website.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Unlikely trio of friends live and swim together

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  I hope you are having a great week and are enjoying this perfect weather!  Come and visit live tigers and have your picture taken with a tiger or tiger cub at T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach.

A lion, a tiger and a bear - oh my! Unlikely trio of wild friends live and swim together at Myrtle Beach sanctuary

Lions, tigers and bears are the kind of apex predators that instill fear in the hearts of most humans. But at the Myrtle Beach Safari and Wildlife Preserve, one unlikely animal trio is warming visitors hearts with their friendship and unusual workout.

Nahma the white tiger, Bam Bam the lion and Maximus the grizzly bear were raised together at the South Carolina preserve and consider each other siblings.

The 1-year-olds were recently photographer swimming in the pool with their handlers, an aquatic workout all three enjoy.

'These three have been playing together all their lives, so they've forgotten their differences,' said Doc Antle who runs the preserve.

Antle coordinates wildlife conservation projects all over the world via RareSpeciesFund.org. He says allowing the animals to swim in his specially constructed pool keeps them healthy, agile and stimulated.

'It's great exercise for them and it helps keep them cool in the summer,' he said. - By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 10 June 2014

Learn more about Doc, the trainers, animals, and the tour at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F.

Monday, June 9, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon everyone from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach! Where in Myrtle Beach can you experience a safari?  What attraction can you visit and feel the leathery hide of an elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, and hear the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour?   

As I was doing some research for the blog this morning, I found this article:

Tigers are Rapidly Disappearing from the Wild
According to the latest estimates, there are only about 3,200 tigers left in the wild on the entire planet. That's a catastrophically sharp decline from the 100,000 tigers that were estimated to be in the wild in 1990. The WWF experts warn that "The big cat, which is native to southern and eastern Asia, could soon become extinct unless urgent action is taken to prevent hunting and loss of habitat."

The Campaign to Double Wild Tiger Population
Countries where tigers are still found in the wild - such as China, India and Bangladesh - have made a commitment to double their numbers by 2022 (Year of the Tiger in the Chinese calendar). But following through on that pledge will be the hard part, and conservation groups are trying to put pressure on them to force them to keep their word.

We Could Lose a Top Predator
If tigers disappear (at least from the wild), we not only lose a top predator that is essential to many ecosystems, but it also means that enough habitat has been destroyed to also endanger many other species. Tiger population health is an indicator of ecosystem health in many Asian countries. by Michael Graham Richard (@Michael_GR)

Take the tour of T.I.G.E.R.S. preserve where you will connect with wildlife in a very intimate way and involve yourself personally in the lives of these amazing animals. Then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Animals you see on TV and movies

Friday, May 9, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  The staff and animals, dedicated to ongoing breeding and international conservation projects are currently in full swing at the 50 acre Preserve and Preservation Station.

T.I.G.E.R.S. was founded by Dr. Bhagavan Antle. He is one of the World’s foremost trainers of big cats and other exotic animals. Doc Antle’s animal actors have appeared in over 500 films, television shows, commercials and advertisements worldwide.

Mary Quinn O'Connor, Reporter program at Fox News describes these animal actors:

If you’ve ever wondered where the animals you see on TV and movies live when they're not on set, or even how they learn to “act”, look no further than Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. This tourist destination, known mainly for its sunny weather and crowded beaches, is also home to Tigers Preservation Station and Safari (T.I.G.E.R.S) a safari for celebrity animals.
 
“Watching the film and television process happen gave me an idea that recreating that for our guests gave them the chance to see animals up close and in action doing things like their favorite television moments,” said T.I.G.E.R.S. Founder and safari director Dr. Bhagavan Antle.
 
“Doc” created a safari for visitors from around the world to come and see these highly trained animals in their natural habitat. You may recognize these animals from films such as "Ace Ventura", "Doctor Doolittle", "Jungle Book", and "Mighty Joe Young".


 
“We act as agents for the animals,” said Antle. “Producers from movie and television call us up and say ‘We need a tiger who will just go up and lay down with an actress,’" said Antle.
 
The trainers at T.I.G.E.R.S make that request a reality. Through hundreds of hours of training a week, these animals become accustomed to working with humans.
 
“That gives the animals an edge in working the movie and television business because they are already so acclimated to the human lifestyle,” said Antle.
 
Thirty years ago, Antle created this unique safari experience where guests could come and interact (sit with them, play with them, and feed them) with these wild, endangered, and even famous animals like nowhere else in the world.


 
“It’s not going to the zoo, it something all together different,” said one safari guest.

The animals at this safari have already starred in over 500 movie and television shows over the past 30 years, and some of these animals still have a long career ahead of them-- like Bubbles the Elephant. Bubbles has starred in many movies, but is most famous for her role in Ace Ventura.
 
“She’s what I call the world’s biggest movie star,” said Antle. “There has been another elephant in a movie but its not as tall or heavy as Bubbles.”
 
By visiting Bubbles or some of your other favorite animal-stars, you are contributing to the Rare Species Fund which was established to provide funding to critical international wildlife conservation programs.
 
“The animal actors and the animals that are here meeting the guests will raise money for grassroots conservation programs that give people the chance to save wildlife throughout the world,” said Antle.

Ian Guerin gave a plug this week in the article called, "Ten reasons to stay at Barefoot Resort in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina":

The T.I.G.E.R.S. (short for The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) Preservation Station gets visitors up close and personal with the world's rarest tiger breeds, apes and chimpanzees. For the more daring, tickets are also available for T.I.G.E.R.S. outdoor preserve, located 17 miles south of Barefoot.

That is the home to Hercules, a 900-pound Liger (lion-tiger hybrid) recognized in the 2014 Guinness Book of World Records as the world's largest cat.

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - experience a safari in Myrtle Beach

Thursday, April 24, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. where the 2014 season is under way!  Where in Myrtle Beach can you experience a safari?  What attraction can you visit and feel the leathery hide of an elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, and hear the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour?   

T.I.G.E.R.S leads the public to thrilling encounters that are both heart pounding and heart warming with the real exotic creatures who rule there.

If you have a fascination for tigers, read on...

The Golden Tabby tiger is one of the world's rarest big cats. This type of tiger became extinct in the wild in 1932 when the last two were shot in Mysore Padesh, India. From work done by us at the Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and our breeding partner Dr. Jossip Marcan we have brought back from the very edge of extinction the Golden Tabby Tiger. The Golden Tabby tiger is a white tiger with red stripes and a red saddle pattern. It has none of the black coloration of a standard Bengal tiger of a Royal White Bengal tiger. We are very proud to say that since the first birth in 1987 that their are now more than 30 Golden Tabby tigers in existence today.

Tigers are incredible growing machines. They weigh around half a pound at birth and can fit in the palm of your hand. As they begin to grow, they gain a half a pound a day, on average, for the first couple of years of their life. This means that a 1-year-old cub weighs close to 300 pounds. The small birth size of tiger babies is a great benefit for the mother tiger. Tiny babies allow mother tigers to stay in top physical condition so they can track, hunt, and kill prey as large as young elephants, small rhinos, and even buffalo a day or so before giving birth, and just a few days afterwards.

Over the last decade T.I.G.E.R.S. have donated over 200 thousand dollars, as well as time, effort and expertise, to grassroots conservation programs in Asia and Africa. The money from the Wildlife tour goes directly to help save the Endangered Wildlife Species and preserve their natural habitats.  For information about T.I.G.E.R.S. visit, www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - One of the best Myrtle Beach attractions

Friday, April 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  I hope you are having a great Friday and will have a safe weekend.

Dr. Bhagavan Antle of T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in Myrtle Beach strives to save Cheetahs.  Dr. Antle and eight exotic animal trainers from T.I.G.E.R.S along with their veterinarian Dr. Sherri Duncan, decided to go and teach the staff of Savannah Cheetah Foundation  how to train cheetahs to our lure system and make a video and photo documentary of this amazing event. Some of the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff have over twenty years experience working as professional videographers and photographers and are continually working with endangered wildlife species.  It is our hope that the sight of a beautiful cheetah pelting across the grass up close and personal both live and on DVD would help inspire their visitors and those who view the video and pictures, towards a more ecologically friendly way of life.

The Foundation was created as a breeding facility for cheetahs, and also as a place for people of all kinds to come and learn about the plight of cheetahs in the wild. Most of the visitors to the preserve are local students, many of whom have been raised with the idea that cheetahs are nuisance animals that need to be eradicated in order to protect livestock. It is to these children of Africa that the message of conservation is most essential.

We came to film and train cheetahs in a place with no name that is a mere ninety minutes drive from the airport, but is as far removed from anything resembling a city as somewhere can be.

Visit one of the best Myrtle Beach attractions, T.I.G.E.R.S. and enjoy a Myrtle Beach Safari for yourself.   

The Rare Species Fund is currently developing a program to reimburse farmers for livestock lost to wild predators, including jaguars. This initiative ensures that the predators do not become a financial liability for the farmers and are therefore less likely to be illegally poached. The RSF rewards farmers in the program who set aside a minimum of twenty percent of the land to be kept in its natural wild state. This ensures that viable habitat will remain for the jaguar as well as other indigenous wildlife, including: tapirs, monkeys, toucans, sloths, caiman and spectacled bears.

Click here for more information on T.I.G.E.R.S. and the RSF.

T.I.G.E.R.S - Best Friends Fur-Ever

Friday, October 11, 2013 by Suzanne Burns




This Baby Monkey, Lion and Tiger Are Best Friends Fur-Ever

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach!  The tour for this season is coming to a close very soon but the staff of professional trainers live with the animals 24/7, year-round.  

Some think it is dangerous to get so close to wild animals like these, but the handlers here at T.I.G.E.R.S. have been with these animals since they were cubs and have developed a special friendship based on love and respect. In fact, Dr. Antle and his partner Kheira have actually delivered many of the cubs in the enclosure with the mothers because of their special relationships.

T.I.G.E.R.S. has a proven method of training these animals: Never treat them as pets, lots of tender loving care, and thousands of hours of one-on-one handling create special relationships.

One such relationship is not between trainer and animal, but between two unlikely animal friends:

Vali the 16-month-old chimp and Bam Bam the 5-month-old grizzly bear made fast friends at Myrtle Beach Safari park, where they put their differences aside to play, cuddle, and more or less, melt our hearts.

The pair were introduced after the South Carolina's park staff realized they were about the same size. "We got them out there playing on a sunny day, and they went on and on for hours," said Park owner Bhagavan Antle. "Neither of them wanted to quit."

After all, not much can slow these buddies down. "They would both lie down and fall asleep at our feet, wake back up and start wrestling again," added Antle.

And that's a routine that repeats itself every single day, species aside.

"Bam Bam ultimately has more power," Antle said, "but Vali tricks him and can constantly get behind him. He will throw things at Bam Bam and run around him in circles."
- peoplepets.com - Barry Bland/Rex USA

Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve Myrtle Beach - Bubbles and Bella

Friday, October 4, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve Myrtle Beach!  The tour and Preservation Station offer guests a collection of experiences that can be life changing. While at the preserves, the participants senses are awakened to a whole new world.  Contact them today to book your tour!

The guidelines of friendship are sometimes unrestricted.  So when it comes to her pal Bella, Bubbles the elephant's is the world's biggest playmate and most impromptu diving board.



Bubbles, a 9,000-pound elephant who was adopted by the safari in 1983, and Bella, the Labrador retriever, are the very best of friends. They live together at the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve Myrtle Beach!

A contractor hired to build a pool at the preserve in 2007 and apparently abandoned his black Lab here.Bubbles and Bella formed an unlikely bond. Now the pair can't get enough of the water or each other

The preserve has documented some of the pair's adorable playdates and if you visit youtube, you will see the video has received 1,135,896 hits so far.  



Sometimes, Bubbles and Bella go for walks together. Other times, they go for long swims. At all times, we are completely enthralled by the two of them.

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org

T.I.G.E.R.S - Hercules makes the Guinness Book of World Records!

Friday, September 20, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good sunny afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  If you've kept up with the local news this past week, you know that Hercules, who lives at the Myrtle Beach wildlife preserve has made the Guinness World Records book!  Read this article from last week:

By Steve Palisin — spalisin@thesunnews.com

Morris the Cat wouldn’t have one paw, let alone one claw, up on Hercules, the world’s largest living feline.

This liger – a hybrid of a lion and tiger – tips the scales at 922 pounds, and is now entered into the 2014 edition of the “Guinness World Records” book, published Thursday (www.guinnessworldrecords.com).

Sara Wilcox, public relations and marketing executive for New York-based Guinness World Records North America, said Hercules lives at Myrtle Beach Safari, an area wildlife preserve. She cited two other vitals of the big cat: a total length of 131 inches and height of 49 inches at the shoulder.

The safari, also known as TIGERS – The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species – where tours are given by reservation, is owned by Bhagavan “Doc” Antle, who also founded the Rare Species Fund ( www.rarespeciesfund.org) in 1982, to help endangered wildlife around the world such as elephants, rhinos, orangutans and other big cats.

Antle was not available for comment for this article, but Wilcox said he furnished Guinness, a company headquartered in London, a summary of various traits about Hercules.

He was born among a litter of four in November 2001 at the preserve and named after the mythological character. The cat, who consumes 20 to 25 pounds of meat daily and has favorite logs he uses to sharpen his claws, also has traveled coast to coast with Antle to promote wildlife conservation.

Guinness officials were told by Antle that Hercules melds two worlds by being brave like a tiger and social like a lion, hence the big cat’s affinity for interaction.

Antle also told Guinness that as a cub, Hercules had a big head into which he grew with age and that if the cat’s averse to doing something, he simply sits down.

 


Recounting how Hercules has reacted to the rarity of snowfall on the Grand Strand, Antle told Guinness that the cat rolled around in the accumulation, enough to make a giant liger snow angel.

Wilcox said Guinness happened upon Hercules through a consultant, and that the cat sets a precedent in the book’s records.

Guinness officials had known of “generic liger cat breeds” but that “not a specific cat” occupied a record as the largest living cat, until Hercules.

“We just knew that the largest living cat probably was the liger,” Wilcox said. “We have not measured a liger before. ... We are aware of other ligers.”

Wilcox said each edition of Guinness World Records contains as many as 4,000 records and that about 3,000 are set or broken, then updated for publishing, every year. Some records, such as the world’s largest man, keep their placeholder among the pages for a long time.

The 2014 edition of the book will include some technological bonus material over which readers can marvel at one-of-a-kind people, feats and elements, all compiled from a database of about 50,000 records tallied with time.

Certain pages in the new book will come with spots that people can scan with a portable communications device, so that anyone who checks out the world’s shortest woman, for instance, will have an enhanced experience to learn about her life through special effects.

“She will come to actual life size in front of you,” Wilcox said.


 Learn more about Doc, the animals and the tour at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Tiger cubs are cute!

Friday, August 9, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from Myrtle Beach!  Visit live tigers and have your picture taken with a tiger or tiger cub!  At T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach, you can see rare tigers up close and uncaged in a living tiger exhibit. The tiger population includes  Bengal tigers, Siberian tigers, Royal White Bengal tigers and the rarest tiger in the world, the Golden Tabby tiger. You can also experience the feel of baby “cubs” on your lap.  This is the experience of a lifetime!

Tiger cubs are cute!  Enjoy these pics!


 

 

Guests at T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station make wondrous experiences live on for a lifetime in the hundreds of individual and group high end professional photographs and video we take of them on this once in a lifetime journey. They leave Preservation Station with images that only a few privileged photographers and explorers on safari have captured after years of travel; a tiger or cheetah running at full speed or swimming across a clear pool, the great apes sliding through the canopy or a large tusked elephant just a breath away. You can tell from their pictures and the letters they send us how it has changed them.

Over the last decade T.I.G.E.R.S. and the Rare Species Fund have donated over 200 thousand dollars, as well as time, effort and expertise, to grassroots conservation programs in Asia and Africa. By being a guest, you are now part of our international conservation programs.

T.I.G.E.R.S. was founded by Dr. Bhagavan Antle. He is one of the World’s foremost trainers of big cats and other exotic animals. Doc Antle’s animal actors have appeared in over 500 films, television shows, commercials and advertisements worldwide.You have seen some of these animals in great films such as Ace Ventura, Forrest Gump, Dr. Dolittle, Mighty Joe Young and many others.

For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - wondrous experiences which live on for a lifetime

Friday, June 28, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good sunny Friday afternoon from Myrtle Beach!  If you love animals and you're looking to make memories that you will cherish for a lifetime, you need to visit T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach.

Preservation Station at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach is a free living tiger exhibit. It is the fund raising effort for the rarest tiger on Earth, the Golden Tabby tiger. It's your chance to see the World's Rarest Tigers, up-close and un-caged for FREE. This is the opportunity of a lifetime. Come visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station and see these animals playing and relaxing in an outdoor environment. You will see Bengal tigers, Siberian tigers, Royal White Bengal tigers and the rarest tiger in the world, the Golden Tabby tiger


T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) is home to some of the world’s most famous animal actors, stars of stage and screen. This is one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  It's is a new kind of zoo that gives a fresh new look at wild animals living with man. It's a zoo that comes to you.

T.I.G.E.R.S. was founded by Dr. Bhagavan Antle. He is one of the World’s foremost trainers of big cats and other exotic animals.  Some of these animals are the rare and on the list of endangered species; Golden Tabby Tigers, Siberian & Bengal, Tigers, Panthers, Leopards, Royal White Tigers, Lions and Jaguars.  There is even one of the most unusual animals in the world, the Liger.  This Gentle Giant is over 11 foot tall and 900 lbs. and is a cross between a male lion and female tiger.  The famous Rafiki Baboons there co-Starred in Ace Ventura with Jim Carrey and in Mr. Magoo with Leslie Nelson as well as Jungle Book. Bubbles the elephant starred in Dr. Dolittle and Ace Ventura when Nature Calls.



Guests at the T..I.G.E.R.S. Preserve enjoy wondrous experiences which live on for a lifetime in the hundreds of individual and group high end professional photographs and video we take of them on this once in a lifetime journey. They leave the tour with images that only a few privileged photographers and explorers on safari have captured after years of travel; a tiger or cheetah running at full speed or swimming across a clear pool, the great apes sliding through the canopy or a large tusked elephant just a breath away. You can tell from their pictures and the letters they send us how it has changed them. This experience happens every day.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - experience a safari in Myrtle Beach!

Friday, June 21, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  Where in Myrtle Beach can you experience a safari?  What attraction can you visit and feel the leathery hide of an elephant, the soft touch of a lynx, and hear the heart pounding sound of tigers running at 55 miles per hour?  



T.I.G.E.R.S will lead the public to thrilling encounters that are both heart pounding and heart warming with the real exotic creatures who rule there.

If you have a fascination for tigers, read on...

The Golden Tabby tiger is one of the world's rarest big cats. This type of tiger became extinct in the wild in 1932 when the last two were shot in Mysore Padesh, India. From work done by us at the Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and our breeding parnter Dr. Jossip Marcan we have brought back from the very edge of extinction the Golden Tabby Tiger. The Golden Tabby tiger is a white tiger with red stripes and a red saddle pattern. It has none of the black coloration of a standard Bengal tiger of a Royal White Bengal tiger. We are very proud to say that since the first birth in 1987 that their are now more than 30 Golden Tabby tigers in existence today.

Tigers are incredible growing machines. They weigh around half a pound at birth and can fit in the palm of your hand. As they begin to grow, they gain a half a pound a day, on average, for the first couple of years of their life. This means that a 1-year-old cub weighs close to 300 pounds. The small birth size of tiger babies is a great benefit for the mother tiger. Tiny babies allow mother tigers to stay in top physical condition so they can track, hunt, and kill prey as large as young elephants, small rhinos, and even buffalo a day or so before giving birth, and just a few days afterwards.

Tigers have far superior teeth to those of the other members of the big cat family including the lion, leopard and jaguar. Not only do they have a sharpened peg of a tooth but their teeth narrow down to a razor sharp edge at the back making the tigers bite much more lethal. Armed with these incredible teeth, tigers are able to bring down prey as large a grizzly bears, rhinocerous and even small elephants and they do this all on their own. Lions are able to hunt large prey but they usually have to do it in groups, called prides.

To learn more about T.I.G.E.R.S, and the animals, visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Info on Doc and the RSF

Friday, May 17, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  I hope you are having a great Friday and will have a safe weekend.

Dr. Bhagavan Antle of T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in Myrtle Beach strives to save Cheetahs.  Dr. Antle and eight exotic animal trainers from T.I.G.E.R.S along with their veterinarian Dr. Sherri Duncan, decided to go and teach the staff of Savannah Cheetah Foundation  how to train cheetahs to our lure system and make a video and photo documentary of this amazing event. Some of the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff have over twenty years experience working as professional videographers and photographers and are continually working with endangered wildlife species.  It is our hope that the sight of a beautiful cheetah pelting across the grass up close and personal both live and on DVD would help inspire their visitors and those who view the video and pictures, towards a more ecologically friendly way of life.

The Foundation was created as a breeding facility for cheetahs, and also as a place for people of all kinds to come and learn about the plight of cheetahs in the wild. Most of the visitors to the preserve are local students, many of whom have been raised with the idea that cheetahs are nuisance animals that need to be eradicated in order to protect livestock. It is to these children of Africa that the message of conservation is most essential.



We came to film and train cheetahs in a place with no name that is a mere ninety minutes drive from the airport, but is as far removed from anything resembling a city as somewhere can be.

Visit one of the best Myrtle Beach attractions, T.I.G.E.R.S. and enjoy a Myrtle Beac Safari for yourself.  



The Rare Species Fund is currently developing a program to reimburse farmers for livestock lost to wild predators, including jaguars. This initiative ensures that the predators do not become a financial liability for the farmers and are therefore less likely to be illegally poached. The RSF rewards farmers in the program who set aside a minimum of twenty percent of the land to be kept in its natural wild state. This ensures that viable habitat will remain for the jaguar as well as other indigenous wildlife, including: tapirs, monkeys, toucans, sloths, caiman and spectacled bears.

 

Click here for more information on T.I.G.E.R.S. and the RSF.

 

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - get close with celebrity animals

Friday, May 10, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good beautiful, sunny, Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  The staff and animals, dedicated to ongoing breeding and international conservation projects are currently in full swing at the 50 acre Preserve and Preservation Station.

T.I.G.E.R.S. was founded by Dr. Bhagavan Antle. He is one of the World’s foremost trainers of big cats and other exotic animals. Doc Antle’s animal actors have appeared in over 500 films, television shows, commercials and advertisements worldwide.



Enjoy this written last season by Mary Quinn O'Connor:

If you’ve ever wondered where the animals you see on TV and movies live when they're not on set, or even how they learn to “act”, look no further than Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. This tourist destination, known mainly for its sunny weather and crowded beaches, is also home to Tigers Preservation Station and Safari (T.I.G.E.R.S) a safari for celebrity animals.
 
“Watching the film and television process happen gave me an idea that recreating that for our guests gave them the chance to see animals up close and in action doing things like their favorite television moments,” said T.I.G.E.R.S. Founder and safari director Dr. Bhagavan Antle.
 
“Doc” created a safari for visitors from around the world to come and see these highly trained animals in their natural habitat. You may recognize these animals from films such as "Ace Ventura", "Doctor Doolittle", "Jungle Book", and "Mighty Joe Young".
 
“We act as agents for the animals,” said Antle. “Producers from movie and television call us up and say ‘We need a tiger who will just go up and lay down with an actress,’" said Antle.
 
The trainers at T.I.G.E.R.S make that request a reality. Through hundreds of hours of training a week, these animals become accustomed to working with humans.
 
“That gives the animals an edge in working the movie and television business because they are already so acclimated to the human lifestyle,” said Antle.
 
Thirty years ago, Antle created this unique safari experience where guests could come and interact (sit with them, play with them, and feed them) with these wild, endangered, and even famous animals like nowhere else in the world.
 
“It’s not going to the zoo, it something all together different,” said one safari guest.

The animals at this safari have already starred in over 500 movie and television shows over the past 30 years, and some of these animals still have a long career ahead of them-- like Bubbles the Elephant. Bubbles has starred in many movies, but is most famous for her role in Ace Ventura.
 
“She’s what I call the world’s biggest movie star,” said Antle. “There has been another elephant in a movie but its not as tall or heavy as Bubbles.”
 
By visiting Bubbles or some of your other favorite animal-stars, you are contributing to the Rare Species Fund which was established to provide funding to critical international wildlife conservation programs.
 
“The animal actors and the animals that are here meeting the guests will raise money for grassroots conservation programs that give people the chance to save wildlife throughout the world,” said Antle.


Mary Quinn O'Connor is part of the Junior Reporter program at Fox News

Over the last decade T.I.G.E.R.S. have donated over 200 thousand dollars, as well as time, effort and expertise, to grassroots conservation programs in Asia and Africa. The money from the Wildlife tour goes directly to help save the Endangered Wildlife Species and preserve their natural habitats.  For information about T.I.G.E.R.S. visit, www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach - Opposites attract

Friday, April 12, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Hello again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Some say opposites attract but what about an orangutan being friends with a dog?  Is it even possible?  With Suryia and Roscoe it is!


When Suryia the orangutan first met Roscoe, a stray dog, they become best friends from the start.  The two became friends when they crossed paths at T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve.  The blue tick hound was immediately spotted by the orangutan who ambled over to make friends.

Founder and Director, Doc Antle said: 'Roscoe looked really thin and a little lost so we fed him and took care of him; 'He followed us through the gate and ran over and found Suryia. As soon as he saw Roscoe, Suryia ran over to him and they started playing. It was unusual because dogs are usually scared of primates but they took to each other straight away. We made a few calls to see if he belonged to anyone and when no-one came forward, Roscoe ended up staying. Now they swim together, play together and Suryia even takes the dog for his walks.

Sounds amazing!  here's a news item from just this week about other animal friends."

From abcnews.go.com
At Noah’s Ark, a wild-animal rescue center in Georgia, the “BLT” are an unlikely trio that even “Oz’s” Dorothy would find hard to fear.

“It’s a lion, a tiger and a bear — oh my!” said Allison Hedgecoth of Noah’s Ark. “They live together and they don’t see their differences. They don’t see their color differences.”

In a small pen, Baloo (an American black bear), Leo (the lion) and Shere Kahn (a Bengal tiger) cuddle, play ball, chase each other around, eat cookies daily and seem to have forged a friendship for life.

“It’s kind of unusual because black bears and tigers would be solitary as adults,” said Rebecca Snyder, a curator of animals at Atlanta’s zoo.

The three predators were rescued as cubs 12 years ago from drug dealers who’d abused and neglected them.

“All of them had issues,” Hedgecoth said. “Leo, the lion, had a big raw spot on his nose. Baloo, the bear, had an ingrown harness where his owners hadn’t lengthened it as he grew, so it actually grew into the skin and it had to be surgically removed. … They have recovered more than 100 percent.”

But when trainers tried to separate the animals, they acted out. For years, trainers said they worried and waited for fights but had witnessed nothing but peace among the three.

Hedgecoth said she didn’t know how the trio had managed to get along together so well and for so long.

 


“I think that the ordeal they went through as youngsters really bonded them together,” she told ABC News. “That’s all that they had. They only had each other for comfort.”

She said separating them now, after more than a decade together, would be “cruel.”

“There definitely is something special going on between the three of them,” she said. “That is definitely a lesson.”


Guests also enjoy wondrous experiences which live on for a lifetime in the hundreds of individual and group high end professional photographs and video we take of them on this once in a lifetime journey. They leave Preservation Station with images that only a few privileged photographers and explorers on safari have captured after years of travel; a tiger or cheetah running at full speed or swimming across a clear pool, the great apes sliding through the canopy or a large tusked elephant just a breath away. You can tell from their pictures and the letters they send us how it has changed them. This experience happens every day.

 Please join in the worldwide education and conservation efforts at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.