T.I.G.E.R.S. - One of the best Myrtle Beach attractions

Friday, April 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S.!  I hope you are having a great Friday and will have a safe weekend.

Dr. Bhagavan Antle of T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve in Myrtle Beach strives to save Cheetahs.  Dr. Antle and eight exotic animal trainers from T.I.G.E.R.S along with their veterinarian Dr. Sherri Duncan, decided to go and teach the staff of Savannah Cheetah Foundation  how to train cheetahs to our lure system and make a video and photo documentary of this amazing event. Some of the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff have over twenty years experience working as professional videographers and photographers and are continually working with endangered wildlife species.  It is our hope that the sight of a beautiful cheetah pelting across the grass up close and personal both live and on DVD would help inspire their visitors and those who view the video and pictures, towards a more ecologically friendly way of life.

The Foundation was created as a breeding facility for cheetahs, and also as a place for people of all kinds to come and learn about the plight of cheetahs in the wild. Most of the visitors to the preserve are local students, many of whom have been raised with the idea that cheetahs are nuisance animals that need to be eradicated in order to protect livestock. It is to these children of Africa that the message of conservation is most essential.

We came to film and train cheetahs in a place with no name that is a mere ninety minutes drive from the airport, but is as far removed from anything resembling a city as somewhere can be.

Visit one of the best Myrtle Beach attractions, T.I.G.E.R.S. and enjoy a Myrtle Beach Safari for yourself.   

The Rare Species Fund is currently developing a program to reimburse farmers for livestock lost to wild predators, including jaguars. This initiative ensures that the predators do not become a financial liability for the farmers and are therefore less likely to be illegally poached. The RSF rewards farmers in the program who set aside a minimum of twenty percent of the land to be kept in its natural wild state. This ensures that viable habitat will remain for the jaguar as well as other indigenous wildlife, including: tapirs, monkeys, toucans, sloths, caiman and spectacled bears.

Click here for more information on T.I.G.E.R.S. and the RSF.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Spring is finally here!

Friday, April 11, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon once again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Spring is finally here!  The 2014 Season began 4 weeks ago and the dedicated Trainers at the Tour are in full force!  Make your reservation today! 

Read what others said recently:

“Once In A Lifetime Experience”
Reviewed April 5, 2014 

We took our grandsons (7 and 10) to the Barefoot Landing photo experience. They were so impressed with the tiger and chimp photo session that we were sure they would enjoy the full tour. We surprised them several days later by driving up to the bamboo gate. After several hours of petting, being petted, and feeding the elephant, they were hard pressed to decide what was the high point. The wolf pup kissed them, as did the chimp and the gibbon. Suri, the orang, was enamored of my beard and smootched me. The eagle was impressive as were the tigers chasing the lure. We also were impressed by the enthusiasm of the staff, who live and bond with the animals. Their work around the world made us proud to support their efforts. It was an excellent use of our tax refund. (We went first week in April. Check with them for times, as they are at the Landing only 5-7 until the weather warms up. There were lots of springtime babies. the wolf pups even howled for us.)

“Awesome Awesome!”
Reviewed April 1, 2014

This is such a fun and rare experience! Realize what it is before you go! It is a chance to hold a baby tiger, chimp, or wolf (wolf not always available). The money is for a fantastic cause. The time you spend with the animals is incredible. Neither of us are huge animal people but where won over with the tender personality of the chimp and the strength of the baby tiger. We loved this experience and the cause it serves with the money! Would recommend to anyone! Thank you to the hard working folks that make this happen!


“Pet the "big kitty" tiger”
Reviewed March 22, 2014

Wonderful chance to get up close and hold a baby tiger, chimp or other wild life. This is truly an amazing experience. Is absolutely awesome to hold the baby chimp and feed the tiger a bottle. The money is used to take care of the preserve. Would highly recommend for a once in a life time adventure.

Take the tour of T.I.G.E.R.S. preserve where you will connect with wildlife in a very intimate way and involve yourself personally in the lives of these amazing animals. Then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org.

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - 2014 season opens tomorrow!

Friday, March 14, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, SC!  Got plans for the weekend?  The weather will be spectacular and tomorrow is THE BIG DAY.  The greatest Myrtle Beach attraction opens for the 2014 season!
 
There are two ways to experience the greatest hands-on, interactive wildlife encounter in the world. You can visit T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station, located at Barefoot Landing in North Myrtle Beach for free! Or you can take the T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounter Tour in Myrtle Beach.


 
Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged! During the tour professional photographers shoot studio quality photographs and video of the tour and the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve experience. This gives you the opportunity to take home a set of portraits and phenomenal videos that are incomparable to any other photo opportunity.
 
This is the best way for you to support our ongoing breeding and international conservation projects and get hands on with what we do.
 
By attending the tour you get one comlimentary 8X10 photo per group of your choice from your tour. However we highly recommend our Photo CD.  Our Photo CD is a professional CD portfolio of you and the animals on the tour. It has each person in your group individually with the animals, your group together with the animals, candid shots of your day and photos of the animals themselves. You end up with several hundred photos that you have the right to reproduce as long as it is not for commerial puposes like ads, billboards, movie and television.
 
Wild Encounter Tours
5 days a week from
March 15, 2014 through October 11, 2014
Tours are on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
Beginning at 10:00am and lasting approx. 3 hours.

Click here to request a Wild Encounters Tour online
OR
Call 843-361-4552
 
Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The 2014 tour begins in 8 days!

Friday, March 7, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach.   The 2014 Season is just 8 days away! 

Some think it's too risky to get close to wild animals, but the handlers at  T.I.G.E.R.S. have been with these animals since they were cubs and have developed a special friendship based on love and respect.  Dr. Antle and his staff have actually helped the mothers deliver many of the cubs at the Preserve.  T.I.G.E.R.S. has a proven method of training these animals: Never treat them as pets, lots of tender loving care, and thousands of hours of one-on-one handling; we even live with the animals 24 hours a day.  

So have you ever wondered, What's the largest cat on earth?  

HIs name is Hercules, so you know he's got to be big.

At 922 pounds, big is an understatement for the world's largest living cat, according to the 2014 Guinness Book of World Records.

Hercules is a liger -- the hybrid offspring of a male lion and a tigress -- who lives at T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. He is 131 inches long, and measures 49 inches tall at the shoulder.

Born from a lion father and tiger mother, Hercules grew into an impressive creature, able to run at speeds of up to 50 mph and eat 100 pounds of food in one sitting.  Ligers have been known to be fat and unhealthy cats, but Hercules is an exceptional specimen that got the best from both feline races.

Despite his gigantic size, Hercules is very tame and Dr. Bhagavan, one of the liger’s caretakers, says looking into his eyes is “like looking into God’s own eyes”.

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, T.I.G.E.R.S. & Preservation Station. All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Catasaurus Rex is One Big CAT!

Friday, February 21, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach.  The temps are much higher now and so is our excitement!  The 2014 season begin in just 22 days!  Make plans now to interact with big cats and other wild animals without a barrier.

Speaking of big cats, enjoy this story:

A 3-foot, 21-pound rescue cat nicknamed "Catasaurus Rex" now has a forever home after being found on the side of the road and rehomed twice.
 
When the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals advertised the massive feline last month, more than 50 people submitted adoption applications.
 
Pickles the catThe rescue decided that Andrew Milicia and his girlfriend, Emily Zarvos, would be a good fit for the feline, whose real name is Pickles.



Photo Credit: Barcroft USA
 
"When we first saw Pickles, he looked like such a beast, but he looked really cool. He's actually bigger than some dogs," Milicia told the Daily Mail. "It didn’t take him long to make himself at home and now he takes up most of the couch when he's laid out."
 
Pickles is thought to be part Maine coon, the largest breed of domestic cat. A Maine coon named Stewie currently holds the world record for longest cat.
 
"He doesn’t realize his size, so he'll knock things over all the time. He's so clumsy," Milicia said. "But it's like so hard to be mad at him. He thinks he's just like a little kitten still."
 
But at more than 20 pounds, Pickles isn’t always easy to handle.
 
"I struggle to pick him up sometimes because he weighs so much," Zarvos said.
 
Despite the difficulties in having such a large cat, Milicia and Zarvos say they can't imagine life without Pickles.
 
The large gray tabby loves to cuddle on the couch, get his nails trimmed and sleep with his new owners in their bed.
 
Although he has feline immunodeficiency virus, the shelter says as long as he stays indoors, he should stay healthy and live a long life.
 
"I'm so happy we have him,” Zarvos said. "He's the best pet you could hope for."
- By Laura Moss Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 2:47 PM

The Wild Encounter Tour is a guided walk through a beautiful 50 acre preserve, which is taken in the company of professional photographers taking photos and video footage to capture the experience for the guests. Visitors can interact with apes, orangutans, and chimpanzees, watch tigers swim, observe gray wolves, fly trained falcons and again have the chance to sit small cubs on their laps. In addition to this the tour comes across Bubbles the four ton African elephant and the Liger, which is a cross between a lion and a tiger and is the largest cat in the world.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Are you ready to ROAR?

Friday, February 7, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Are you ready to ROAR?  In just a few days, the Myrtle Beach streets will be a roaring good time as The Myrtle Beach Marathon once again partners T.I.G.E.R.S. and the Rare Species Fund to create a weekend filled with wild animal encounters up-close and eye-to-eye. Combine that with a flat, fast course, miles of sandy beaches, world class dining, shopping, golf, and entertainment and you're assured to have an exciting and wild experience!


From www.mbmyrtlbeachmaraton.com:

Do you feel like unleashing your inner beast along the edge of a continent? The Myrtle Beach Marathon has partnered with the Rare Species Fund for International Wildlife Conservation to create a weekend filled with wild animal encounters and opportunities to connect with rare species that you’ve only seen on television. Marathon runners are a perfect group to support this cause due to their love of the outdoors and desire to help the endangered and rare species throughout the world. The Myrtle Beach Marathon started as a way for runners to give back! In fact, the Myrtle Beach Marathon emerged from five Myrtle Beach residents’ participation in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s “Team in Training” (TNT) program. In becoming a Marathon weekend, more events were added as was support for additional charities. Today, each Marathon event supports one or more charities including the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of South Carolina (since its first event in 1998), the Coastal South Carolina Chapter of the American Red Cross, and Horry County Schools.

Beginning in 2013, we have added the Rare Species Fund, a non-profit wildlife conservation group located in Myrtle Beach, SC to the recipient list. Funding for the group is derived from The Institute for Greatly Endangered and Rare Species (T.I.G.E.R.S.) located in Myrtle Beach, SC. T.I.G.E.R.S. houses a stunning group of the world’s most rare and endangered species, some of which you will meet during exciting animal encounters scheduled throughout the three-day event! Let us hear you ROAR!!

For over 25 years, their wildlife conservation and education programs have been funded entirely by offering incredible wildlife encounters.  Come visit The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and Preservation Station to share these incredible experiences with your family and friends while helping to save some of the rarest species on Earth.

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The 2014 season begins in 44 days!

Friday, January 31, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon and good Friday to all from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  For those of you who wished for chilly weather, you got your wish!  Winter months are perfect for making plans for the warmer weather to come.  If you live here or are planning a visit, you should definitely plan to visit T.I.G.E.R.S.  The 2014 season begins in 44 days!



Read what people are saying!!!

"Interact with exotic animals, play with baby Tigers, White Tigers, Wolves, & Lions. The best money I have ever spent and look forward to doing this again! I highly reccomend this to Everyone!!!" -  M. Benson (visited 10/2013)

"We have been anticipating our visit to our Encounter since Nov of 08 The animals and caregivers are marvelous, the presentations and photos taken by the staff are one of a kind -We are thrilled to have been able to attend-Can hardly wait to visit again." - S. Lee (visited 09/2013)

" It is a first class run operation by a amazing team who does a lot of animal preservation work as well. The tours and pictures with the tiger cubs help support the animal and the preserve." - S. Webster (visited 09/2013)

"What are the right words to use, just pick, Wonderful, amazing, incredible, awesome, experience of a lifetime, the list goes on! The staff is great, the animals are the best." - G. Calboun (visited 08/2013)  

T.I.G.E.R.S.,(The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) is a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational and entertaining interactive programs.  All of the animals can be seen up close and uncaged in close personal contact with their trainers.  When you take the tour, you are helping endangered and exotic animals everywhere.  

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Opening day for the Wild Encounters Tour 2014 season is in 58 days!

Friday, January 17, 2014 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon once again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  It's getting closer and closer, the opening day for the Wild Encounters Tour 2014 season is in 58 days!  

The Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged!

Here are two of the animals you will meet:

She has a tender heart, a nice hairy shoulder to cry on - and she knows where her zoo keeps the baby wipes.

So Anjana the chimpanzee is well qualified to be a kitten-sitter.

Since orphaned puma cub Sierra turned up at the zoo, Anjana has helped her human carers with all the feeding, cuddling and chasing duties.




Anjana and Baby Cougar

Primate mum: Anjana the chimp helps zookeepers to care for orphaned puma cub, Sierra. The chimpanzee, who is five, has lived her whole life at The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species (TIGERS) in South Carolina, in the U.S..

She learned to care for little big cats while in the charge of resident feline curator China York.

Park director Dr Bhagavan Antle said: "Chimpanzees are great learners and imitators so it wasn’t long before she took on the right behaviours that were necessary to keep the kittens in line."


Anjana and cougar

Milking it: Anjana makes sure Sierra gets fed and even knows where the wet wipes are kept

"If Sierra is running around too fast then Anjana will scoop her up and make sure she doesn’t get into any trouble."

Anjana has already helped to bring up two royal white tiger cubs, a leopard and four lions. Dr Antle added: "She is a great assistant. If you need a baby wipe you can just tell her and she’ll run off and get it."


Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.
 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The newest RSF project

Friday, December 20, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Merry Christmas from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Support of outstanding wildlife conservation has always been the focus of Dr. Bhagavan Antle and his staff at T.I.G.E.R.S.  

Here is the newest RSF project:
 
Rare Species Fund Aids Scientists in Mountain Gorilla Conservation in Uganda


Christmas came early this year for the scientists of the Gorilla Research Clinic (run by Conservation Through Public Health, CTPH) in Buhoma, Uganda. The Rare Species Fund received their wish list and set to work helping to make it a better holiday season for the gorillas and some local inhabitants of south-western Uganda. Instead of using a sleigh to deliver a sack full of toys, the RSF arrived at the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in a Land Rover carrying cases full of scientific equipment. Included in this delivery were more than 3000 test tubes for samples, a vortex mixer with attachments, pipettes, centrifuge adapters, 3 digital cameras, a laptop computer, microscope light bulbs and even a case of crypto-giardia tests that required refrigeration all the way from South Carolina to the jungles of Uganda. This donation is considered quite significant as these materials are all but impossible to come by in such a remote location.


Conservation Through Public Health addresses one of the primary conservation issues surrounding some of the last mountain gorillas by monitoring gorilla, human and livestock health. Mountain gorillas are highly endangered; approximately 800 currently exist. These gorillas are highly protected by local authorities, but one of their biggest threats lies in their similarity to humans and their susceptibility to many of the same diseases. This is of particular concern in Uganda where more than a third of the population is living on less than $1.50 per day. CTPH not only monitors gorilla health, their extensive community outreach programs educate local villagers about proper hygiene, livestock management and disease prevention, helping to address the problem at the source.

For over 25 years, their wildlife conservation and education programs have been funded entirely by offering incredible wildlife encounters.  Come visit The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species and Preservation Station to share these incredible experiences with your family and friends while helping to save some of the rarest species on Earth.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Big Cat Training Part 2

Friday, December 13, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  The 2014 season opens March 15 and I hope you're planning to make a reservation soon.  

Last week, I posted the first part of an article by By Dr. Bhagavan Antle, Director at T.I.G.E.R.S.  As promised, here is part 2:  

Big Cat Safety, Handling and Training

By Dr. Bhagavan Antle, Director at T.I.G.E.R.S.

Will I be able to train my own big cat?

Real animal trainers who work big cats (the couple dozen + or - that exist), very rarely if ever have accidents with members of the public. Trainers are bitten and even sometimes killed, while working and always by making stupid mistakes. Trained big cats are rare; 99.9% of all big cats are not trained.

In my experience, only 1 in 8 cats will ever be trained enough to have a contact relationship with you, when it's an adult of 7 years or more. Most stop being interested in the first 3 years and become aggressive when asked to work, many within a year. It takes a lot of time, many many hours a week to start training that will usually end in disappointment after a few years and a few thousand hours but to have real trained cats that is the only way: try and try again.


The time it takes and commitment to train a big cat is huge and goes on for years. I have meet no one who understands and practices it who is not doing it professionally i.e. being paid on a regular basis to have cats out of cage and who has no other job and does only animal training full time. Everyone else is generally fooling around and is a hazard to them self and any who come in contact with their cats.

Do not expect to understand Tigerese half as fast as you would Chinese. It takes ten years + of full time big cat experienced with many different animals under the guidance of a trainer to begin to understand big cat training. Animal training is a set of experiences that must be had in order to understand it.

A single person or a pair of people cannot work a big cat outside of a cage (no perimeter fence). It takes a team of highly trained people to walk and work with a big cat. 3 to 4 or more people with years of experience are needed to make it happen safely.


Will my big cat be safe to handle if I raise it properly?

So many people are caught up in what I call the" Born Free Myth" thinking that if they care for an infant cat it will bond to them and have a less dangerous relationship with them. Raising a cat from birth or from young has very little to do if anything with it growing up and having a relationship of trust and contact with it throughout its life. Most pro trainers prefer to start cats training at 1 year old this prevents many of the juvenile behaviors of testing and aggressive play from being a part of the traine's relationship. Many cats are very nice when they are young, but may become killers as they mature, no matter how you treat them.

Of course their are exceptions to every rule and many a cub, the keeper/handler/pet owner thinks they have the perfect one, but they are 1 in a thousand and you cannot tell you have one until it is seven to ten years old and by that time it's usually too late and someone has paid the price.

As I hear over and %^*#@ OVER Roy's tiger attacked him! As one news article says, "Roy, who has taken medication for high blood pressure for years, says he had recently begun to suffer dizzy spells." This one spell, unfortunately, occurred in the presence of a very large tiger. "I started feeling kind of weak," says Roy, who still speaks slowly but has recovered most of his German-accented speech. "I fell over."

If you fall over even the best of cats will give you a bite. Trainers need to stay on their feet and be in top physical shape. Roy was not in top shape; he had heart trouble. However, just add a sense of perspective, if he was driving on the highway it could have been much worse.

In conclusion

I still think this is your right to have your own tiger and to be killed by your own tiger; just keep it in a cage forever and don't let anyone else near you or watch you have it happen.  I often say that as a MD, I can talk you trough taking out someone's kidney but I cannot talk you through tiger training. You have to live it to understand it.

Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged!

 

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Home to over 60 big cats

Friday, November 15, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good chilly afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  

Come visit the 50-acre preserve, home to over 60 big cats.  The 2014 season opens March 16th!  I just found out this week that T.I.G.E.R.S. will be featured on Big The National Geographic Channel November 29.  The episode, called Super Cat will be aired during Big Cat Week on the network.  More on this later.

Some of the big cats you will see on the Nat Geo episode and at T.I.G.E.R.S. are:
 

Bengal Tiger - This cat is the most numerous tiger subspecies  The total population is estimated at fewer than 2,500 individuals with a decreasing trend.  Over the past century tiger numbers have fallen dramatically.  None of the Tiger Conservation Landscapes within the Bengal tiger range is large enough to support an effective population size of 250 individuals. Habitat losses and the extremely large-scale incidences of poaching are serious threats to the species' survival.

 

 



Liger - The liger is a hybrid cross between a male lion and a tigress. Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species.  Hercules, who resides at the preserve (pictured above) is The World's Largest Living Cat according to the 2014 Guinness Book of World Records    Ligers are extremely social animals. They are happy and content living with both lions and tigers.

 

 



Leopards - Leopards are graceful and powerful big cats closely related to lions, tigers, and jaguars. They live in sub-Saharan Africa, northeast Africa, Central Asia, India, and China. However, many of their populations are endangered, especially outside of Africa.  Adept climbers, leopards will often drag their food into trees to protect it from scavengers.

Learn more about the animals and the preserve at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.
 

T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounters Tour - What if...?

Friday, November 8, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. once again!  What if you were told there was a place near Myrtle Beach where you would be able to hold a baby tiger?  What would you do for a chance to monkey around with apes or watch an elephant swim?  

T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounters Tour is a guided walk through a fifty acre preserve in Myrtle Beach, just 17 miles South of Barefoot Landing, where you'll meet tigers, wolves, leopards, chimpanzees, orangutans, and other endangered species, many of them up-close and un-caged!

Tours run 3-5 days a week from March 15, 2014 through October 11, 2014. They begin at 10:00 am and last approximately 3 hours.

Guests may expect a wondrous experience that will live on for a lifetime in the hundreds of individual and group high end professional photographs and video taken on this once in a lifetime journey. 

Some think it is dangerous to get so close to wild animals like these, but the handlers here at T.I.G.E.R.S. have been with these animals since they were cubs and have developed a special friendship based on love and respect. In fact, Dr. Antle and his partner Kheira have actually delivered many of the cubs in the enclosure with the mothers because of their special relationships.

T.I.G.E.R.S. has a proven method of training these animals: Never treat them as pets, lots of tender loving care, and thousands of hours of one-on-one handling create special relationships.



Please join in on worldwide education and conservation efforts at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - The RSF International wildlife conservation program

Friday, November 1, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good afternoon again from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  If this is your first time here, let me introduce you...The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species is a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational and entertaining interactive programs.  If you're a regular reader of this blog, welcome back!



T.I.G.E.R.S's animal ambassadors are important living examples of current worldwide environmental issues, helping the institute teach people about the importance of conservation and global biodiversity. T.I.G.E.R.S. also works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in Africa and Thailand.

In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, their personnel have been involved in field research as well. The TIGERS Preservation Stations help make all of this possible as they entertain and educate the public about the importance of wildlife and the environment



A percentage of revenues taken in by T.I.G.E.R.S goes to The Rare Species Fund.  It was established to provide funding to critical on the ground international wildlife concervation programs, thereby complimenting the educational messages and field research of T.I.G.E.R.S The RSE also receives funding from the generosity of donations form exhibit guests, and the general public.

The Rare Species Fund actively supports the African Association of Zoos and Aquaria (PAAZAB) in it's efforts to improve African zoo collection management, captive animal husbandry, and public educational messages. On a Continent where millions of wildebeest make an annual migration of several hundred miles, covering a huge swath of two countries, accompanied by zebra and other plains game, as well as many rare and endangered predators, almost 99 per cent of all African youth will never see any of these animals in their natural habitat.

 

For more information, please go to www.myrtlebeachsafari.com and www.rarespeciesfund.org.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - "Lifelong dream fulfilled!!!"

Friday, October 25, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!   I hope you enjoy this post.  Last week, I shared very positive feedback from a former guest.  Again, this week enjoy these recent comments from Friends & Supporters of T.I.G.E.R.S. Myrtle Beach:

“INCREDIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!
This review is for the tour out on the preserve. What are the right words to use, just pick, Wonderful, amazing, incredible, awesome, experience of a lifetime, the list goes on! The staff is great, the animals are the best. The area you go to is well taken care of, and sure looks like alot of happy animals to me, and looked well taken care of to me, not just cared for but loved. George, Yorktown, VA Visited September 2013


“Lifelong dream fulfilled!!!”
To hold a magnificent baby tiger was such an awesome experience that it actually had me in tears!! The staff was absolutely excellent and take exceptional care of the animals!! I am very sensitive about wild animals being confined in captivity and will very quickly pick up on any signs of stress in the animals behavior. These animals are very happy! Surprisingly reasonable prices considering you are holding one of the world's most endangered large cats!! This was what I asked for on my 50th birthday and is now my standing birthday wish every year!!!
Flying, Lancaster, OH Visited September 2013
 


“Great experience!”
This is an awesome opportunity! Well worth it and it goes to a great cause. Only thing I would like is if we had a little more time with the tigers.                                                                     Candi, Visited September 2013


“AMAZING!!!”
I cannot say enough good things about this place. The interactions with the animals was unlike anything I ever could have imagined. The staff was perfect, the photography was great, and the snacks were delicious. It was worth every penny spent! And Kody was adorable!                  Kathy P., Clinton, NJ Visited May 2013


T.I.G.E.R.S. Wild Encounters Tour
Wild Encounter Tours run 3-5 days a week from March 15, 2014 through October 11, 2014.
They begin at 10:00am and last approx. 3 hours.
www.myrtlebeachsafari.com


T.I.G.E.R.S. Preservation Station
North Myrtle Beach, SC 29588
Days of Operation:     March 15, 2014 thru October 11, 2014, daily
The hours of operation vary throughout the year. 
www.myrtlebeachsafari.com

T.I.G.E.R.S. - Feedback from former guests

Friday, October 18, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!   I hope you enjoy the comments, posts and pictures you see here.  I've kept you up to date on the animals, the Director, Dr. Bhagavan Antle and the T.I.G.E.R.S. staff.   


Now that the 2013 season has wrapped up, I want to share some of the feedback from former tour guests.  Look for more in the coming weeks.   

Dear Dr. Antle,
 
I intended to send you a handwritten letter; however, if I wait to do that, it may not get done.
 
For as long as I can remember (and that's a long time because I'm almost 67 years old!), there were only two things I always wanted to do: one was ride a horse on the beach and the other was hug a tiger.  In February, 2012, I rode a horse on the beach and while he swam in the Caribbean Sea.  On Monday, September 16, I hugged a tiger, thanks to  you and your wonderful facility in Myrtle Beach.
 
When I asked my friends to join me for the tour, we were excited about interacting with the animals.  Never did we think the experience would be as incredible as it was!  We were extremely impressed with how well-planned everything was, right down to only having small cups for liquid mid-tour since it would be a little while before a rest room would be available.  We were also impressed with the cleanliness of the grounds as well as the animals.  The timing was amazing!  While we watched the tigers swimming, your staff was busy preparing the CD's and DVD's for those who ordered them.  To have a place for each group to view it's pictures was a great idea and very well done.  We were so pleased with the quality and number of pictures on the CD.
 


The best part, however, was the opportunity to bottle feed a lion and play with those darling cubs.  I had one camp on my lap for several minutes while another was crawling up my legs onto my lap.  Believe me, I was in my glory.  A life-long dream came true that day.  Then we interacted with the orangutan (I got to give him a bottle as well) and the gibbon.  My friends and I had no idea the tour would be so interactive, educational and just plain wonderful.
 
You and all of your staff (we loved Rob's humor) are to be commended for the care and protection you are providing for these wonderful animals. We thank all the staff for taking time from their regular duties to share their knowledge and also the animals with whom we might never otherwise have had the opportunity to interact.  God's handiwork was wonderfully displayed in the well-kept grounds and His beautiful creatures!
 
Thank you so much for the work you do and your vision to preserve these endangered and rare species.  You provided an experience I will never forget!
 
Sincerely,
Nancy H.


Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org.

T.I.G.E.R.S - Best Friends Fur-Ever

Friday, October 11, 2013 by Suzanne Burns




This Baby Monkey, Lion and Tiger Are Best Friends Fur-Ever

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. and Preservation Station in Myrtle Beach!  The tour for this season is coming to a close very soon but the staff of professional trainers live with the animals 24/7, year-round.  

Some think it is dangerous to get so close to wild animals like these, but the handlers here at T.I.G.E.R.S. have been with these animals since they were cubs and have developed a special friendship based on love and respect. In fact, Dr. Antle and his partner Kheira have actually delivered many of the cubs in the enclosure with the mothers because of their special relationships.

T.I.G.E.R.S. has a proven method of training these animals: Never treat them as pets, lots of tender loving care, and thousands of hours of one-on-one handling create special relationships.

One such relationship is not between trainer and animal, but between two unlikely animal friends:

Vali the 16-month-old chimp and Bam Bam the 5-month-old grizzly bear made fast friends at Myrtle Beach Safari park, where they put their differences aside to play, cuddle, and more or less, melt our hearts.

The pair were introduced after the South Carolina's park staff realized they were about the same size. "We got them out there playing on a sunny day, and they went on and on for hours," said Park owner Bhagavan Antle. "Neither of them wanted to quit."

After all, not much can slow these buddies down. "They would both lie down and fall asleep at our feet, wake back up and start wrestling again," added Antle.

And that's a routine that repeats itself every single day, species aside.

"Bam Bam ultimately has more power," Antle said, "but Vali tricks him and can constantly get behind him. He will throw things at Bam Bam and run around him in circles."
- peoplepets.com - Barry Bland/Rex USA

Myrtle Beach attraction, T.I.G.E.R.S. (The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species) and the R.S.F. (Rare Species Fund) are based in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For more information, please visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve Myrtle Beach - Bubbles and Bella

Friday, October 4, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good Friday afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve Myrtle Beach!  The tour and Preservation Station offer guests a collection of experiences that can be life changing. While at the preserves, the participants senses are awakened to a whole new world.  Contact them today to book your tour!

The guidelines of friendship are sometimes unrestricted.  So when it comes to her pal Bella, Bubbles the elephant's is the world's biggest playmate and most impromptu diving board.



Bubbles, a 9,000-pound elephant who was adopted by the safari in 1983, and Bella, the Labrador retriever, are the very best of friends. They live together at the T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve Myrtle Beach!

A contractor hired to build a pool at the preserve in 2007 and apparently abandoned his black Lab here.Bubbles and Bella formed an unlikely bond. Now the pair can't get enough of the water or each other

The preserve has documented some of the pair's adorable playdates and if you visit youtube, you will see the video has received 1,135,896 hits so far.  



Sometimes, Bubbles and Bella go for walks together. Other times, they go for long swims. At all times, we are completely enthralled by the two of them.

Please visit, support and join T.I.G.E.R.S. and the R.S.F in their worldwide education and conservation efforts.  For more info, go to myrtlebeachsafari.com and rarespeciesfund.org

T.I.G.E.R.S - Hercules makes the Guinness Book of World Records!

Friday, September 20, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good sunny afternoon from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  If you've kept up with the local news this past week, you know that Hercules, who lives at the Myrtle Beach wildlife preserve has made the Guinness World Records book!  Read this article from last week:

By Steve Palisin — spalisin@thesunnews.com

Morris the Cat wouldn’t have one paw, let alone one claw, up on Hercules, the world’s largest living feline.

This liger – a hybrid of a lion and tiger – tips the scales at 922 pounds, and is now entered into the 2014 edition of the “Guinness World Records” book, published Thursday (www.guinnessworldrecords.com).

Sara Wilcox, public relations and marketing executive for New York-based Guinness World Records North America, said Hercules lives at Myrtle Beach Safari, an area wildlife preserve. She cited two other vitals of the big cat: a total length of 131 inches and height of 49 inches at the shoulder.

The safari, also known as TIGERS – The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species – where tours are given by reservation, is owned by Bhagavan “Doc” Antle, who also founded the Rare Species Fund ( www.rarespeciesfund.org) in 1982, to help endangered wildlife around the world such as elephants, rhinos, orangutans and other big cats.

Antle was not available for comment for this article, but Wilcox said he furnished Guinness, a company headquartered in London, a summary of various traits about Hercules.

He was born among a litter of four in November 2001 at the preserve and named after the mythological character. The cat, who consumes 20 to 25 pounds of meat daily and has favorite logs he uses to sharpen his claws, also has traveled coast to coast with Antle to promote wildlife conservation.

Guinness officials were told by Antle that Hercules melds two worlds by being brave like a tiger and social like a lion, hence the big cat’s affinity for interaction.

Antle also told Guinness that as a cub, Hercules had a big head into which he grew with age and that if the cat’s averse to doing something, he simply sits down.

 


Recounting how Hercules has reacted to the rarity of snowfall on the Grand Strand, Antle told Guinness that the cat rolled around in the accumulation, enough to make a giant liger snow angel.

Wilcox said Guinness happened upon Hercules through a consultant, and that the cat sets a precedent in the book’s records.

Guinness officials had known of “generic liger cat breeds” but that “not a specific cat” occupied a record as the largest living cat, until Hercules.

“We just knew that the largest living cat probably was the liger,” Wilcox said. “We have not measured a liger before. ... We are aware of other ligers.”

Wilcox said each edition of Guinness World Records contains as many as 4,000 records and that about 3,000 are set or broken, then updated for publishing, every year. Some records, such as the world’s largest man, keep their placeholder among the pages for a long time.

The 2014 edition of the book will include some technological bonus material over which readers can marvel at one-of-a-kind people, feats and elements, all compiled from a database of about 50,000 records tallied with time.

Certain pages in the new book will come with spots that people can scan with a portable communications device, so that anyone who checks out the world’s shortest woman, for instance, will have an enhanced experience to learn about her life through special effects.

“She will come to actual life size in front of you,” Wilcox said.


 Learn more about Doc, the animals and the tour at www.myrtlebeachsafari.com.

T.I.G.E.R.S. - A wonderful interactive experience

Thursday, September 12, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Good day from T.I.G.E.R.S. in Myrtle Beach!  Where can you go to have a wonderful interactive experience with wild animals?  TIGERS Preserve of course.  The season ends next month so book your tour as soon as possible.  



T.I.G.E.R.S. was created as a wildlife education organization, dedicated to promoting global conservation with informative, educational, and entertaining interactive programs. Director Dr. Bhagavan Antle works closely with international wildlife conservation projects in South America, Africa and Thailand. In addition to providing much needed funds for these programs, The personnel have been involved in field research as well.

Doc and his crew are wonderful and truly care about saving endangered species.  



Take the tour of T.I.G.E.R.S. preserve where you will connect with wildlife in a very intimate way and involve yourself personally in the lives of these amazing animals. Then walk away into the world with a desire to save these creatures and help preserve their environments.

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve.  Come to see the White Tigers, a liger and other amazing animals in Myrtle Beach at one of the most exciting animal adventures ever.  All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.

T.I.G.E.R.S. Preserve - Experience this Wildlife presentation

Friday, August 30, 2013 by Suzanne Burns

Hi and good Friday afternoon from TIGERS Preserve in South Carolina.  Dr. Bhagavan Antle has an attraction for you to visit in Myrtle Beach.  You can see up close and personal a variety of endangered Tiger Species as well as several other endangered wildlife species.  It is a one of a kind Animal Preserve in Myrtle Beach.  



Doc is a conservationist who trains the animals to become “animal ambassadors.” Doc and his team of highly skilled animal trainers spend just about every waking hour working with these magnificent beasts. As animal ambassadors, their role is to make an emotional connection with whom they come in contact. Hopefully, they will impact members of the public enough to encourage them to help fight species extinction.  

The tigers, lions, panthers, wolves, apes and elephants are well protected, loved, and fed, cared for and adored. No animal poachers or rainforest-destroying palm oil companies could kill or displace them as long as they are here.



Experience this Wildlife presentation with the world's rarest big cats.  At T.I.G.E.R.S you will observe and learn about many rare and unique animals, in a new and completely different way. You will not see our animals sleeping or pacing in cages, as you may find in "traditional" zoos. Instead you will have a look at some of the most magnificent creatures on Earth up close and uncaged you can see and photograph the animals climbing and jumping and doing all the natural activities they would normally do in the wild.  

Go online and visit www.myrtlebeachsafari.com for more information about the Rare Species Fund, the tour and Tigers Preserve. All proceeds from the tour go to The Rare Species Fund and The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species.